The Bride of the Wilderness (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Open Road Media, Nov 22, 2011 - Fiction - 440 pages
5 Reviews
Born in squalid London at the turn of the eighteenth century, a girl makes a fresh start in the New World

Fanny’s father, Henry Harding, has known Oliver Barebones since the two men were children. Together they survived the Great Plague and the Great Fire, and now they are rich, middle-aged, and unmarried. Everyone’s shocked when Oliver, a lifelong bachelor, falls headfirst for a superstitious young girl named Rose. In two days he’s decided to marry her. For the Hardings and the Barebones, it will be years before they find such happiness again. Ruin comes to them all in the shape of Alfred Montagu, a cold-hearted moneylender who ensnares them in crushing debt and schemes to marry Fanny. After her father dies, Fanny attempts to take refuge in France. It’s not far enough to escape her troubles, so with Oliver and Rose, she departs for a far-off place called Connecticut, dodging Montagu by diving into the teeth of dangers no London girl could ever imagine.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
3
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: The Bride Of The Wilderness (Paul Christopher #06)

User Review  - Ysabeau - Goodreads

One of the best historical novels I've read in years. In scope and tone reminded me of the early westerns of Allan Eckart, but the characterizations are far more nuanced and expansive. There's a ... Read full review

Review: The Bride Of The Wilderness (Paul Christopher #06)

User Review  - Susie - Goodreads

This is an engaging historical fiction novel set in England and the new world (both Canada and the US). There is lots of gruesome description of torture, so beware. The audiobook is read by Pam Ward ... Read full review

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

A former operative for the CIA, Charles McCarry (b. 1930) is America’s most revered author of espionage fiction. Born in Massachusetts, McCarry began his writing career in the army, as a correspondent for Stars and Stripes. In the 1950s he served as a speechwriter for President Eisenhower before taking a post with the CIA, for which he traveled the globe as a deep cover operative. He left the Agency in 1967, and set about converting his experiences into fiction. His first novel, The Miernik Dossier (1971), introduced Paul Christopher, an American spy who struggles to balance his family life with his work. McCarry has continued writing about Christopher and his family for decades, producing ten novels in the series to date. A former editor-at-large for National Geographic, McCarry has written extensive nonfiction, and continues to write essays and book reviews for various national publications. Ark (2011) is his most recent novel.

Bibliographic information