Essays: Scientific, Political and Speculative, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, & Roberts, 1858 - Science
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Page 150 - But little do men perceive what solitude is, and how far it extendeth. For a crowd is not company, and faces are but a gallery of pictures, and talk but a tinkling cymbal, where there is no love.
Page 241 - In hurdled cotes amid the field secure, Leaps o'er the fence with ease into the fold: Or as a thief, bent to unhoard the cash Of some rich burgher, whose substantial doors...
Page 118 - The Society for the Liberation of Religion from State Patronage and Control...
Page 237 - The Border slogan rent the sky! A Home! a Gordon! was the cry: Loud were the clanging blows; Advanced, forced back, now low, now high, The pennon sunk and rose; As bends the bark's mast in the gale, When rent are rigging, shrouds, and sail, It wavered mid the foes.
Page 246 - Fitz-James alone wore cap and plume. To him each lady's look was lent, On him each courtier's eye was bent, Midst furs and silks and jewels sheen He stood, in simple Lincoln green, The centre of the glittering ring, And Snowdoun's Knight is Scotland's King! As wreath of snow, on mountain breast, Slides from the rock that gave it rest, Poor Ellen glided from her stay, And at the Monarch's feet she lay; No word her choking voice commands : She showed the ring, she clasped her hands.
Page 237 - The many men, so beautiful! And they all dead did lie: And a thousand thousand slimy things Lived on; and so did I.
Page 249 - As autumn's dark storms pour from two echoing hills, towards each other approached the heroes. As two dark streams from high rocks meet and mix, and roar on the plain; loud, rough, and dark in battle, meet Lochlin and Inisfail.
Page 238 - Saturn, quiet as a stone, Still as the silence round about his lair; Forest on forest hung about his head Like cloud on cloud. No stir of air was there, Not so much life as on a summer's day Robs not one light seed from the feather'd grass, But where the dead leaf fell, there did it rest.
Page 229 - Regarding language as an apparatus of symbols for the conveyance of thought, we may say that, as in a mechanical apparatus, the more simple and the better arranged its parts, the greater will be the effect produced. In either case, whatever force is absorbed by the machine is deducted from the result.
Page 230 - ... presented to him, requires part of this power ; to arrange and combine the images suggested requires a further part ; and only that part which remains can be used for realizing the thought conveyed. Hence, the more time and attention it takes to receive and understand each sentence, the less time and attention can be given to the contained idea ; and the less vividly will that idea be conceived.

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