Challenging the Traditional Axioms: Translation Into a Non-mother Tongue

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John Benjamins Publishing, Jan 1, 2005 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 163 pages
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Translation into a non-mother tongue or inverse translation, especially of literary texts, has always been frowned upon within Translation Studies in Western cultures and regarded by literary scholars and linguists as an activity of dubious worth, doomed to fail. The study, which received an award from EST in 2001, sets out to challenge the established view and to critically question some of the axiomatic assumptions of Western theorists. Its challenge is supported by extensive empirical research involving reader response to translations of specific literary texts. The conclusion reached is that the quality of the translation, its fluency and acceptability in the target language environment depend primarily on the as yet undetermined individual abilities of the particular translator, his/her translation strategy and knowledge of the source and target cultures, and not on his/her mother tongue or the direction in which s/he is translating.
  

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Contents

Denning the term native speaker
6
Translation into a nonmother tongue and team translation as a part
34
Granting the status of a native speaker to immigrants
42
Ivan Cankar and his style
49
Presentation of the selected originals
55
Children and Old People
61
A Cup of Coffee by Louis Adamic
77
A Cup of Coffee by Agata Zmajic and M PetersRoberts
83
A Cup of Coffee by Elza Jereb and Alasdair MacKinnon
89
Children and Old People by AnthonyJ Klancar
91
Native speakership in the analysed translations
104
Conclusion
119
APPENDIX II
133
Notes
147
Index
161
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