Orations, written for, and at the request of young gentlemen of the university, and delivered by them at public commencements in the college hall. Essays (Google eBook)

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T. Dobson, 1792 - Admiralty
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Page 156 - ... he enjoyed himself in quiet at head-quarters. But the experiment did not answer his expectation ; it was impossible it should, since a principal part of the gratification consists in the lady's having an uncontrolled right to torment her husband at least once a year, and to turn him out of doors and take the reins of government into her own hands.
Page 316 - He hath put down the mighty from their seats, and exalted them of low degree. He hath filled the hungry with good things, and the rich he hath sent empty away.
Page 154 - ... the pressure of the whole forces the corner of the table through the canvas of the first. The frame and glass of a fine print are to be cleaned ; the spirit and oil used on this occasion are suffered to leak through and...
Page 159 - ... of those who are not accustomed to so rough a path. But habit reconciles every thing. It is diverting enough to see a...
Page 148 - ... is to transact the public business: they have been accustomed to do it in this way, and therefore it appears to them the most rational and convenient way. Indeed, if we consider it impartially, there seems to be no reason why a counsellor may not be as wise in an earthen jar as in an elbow chair ; or why the good of the people may not be as maturely considered in the one as in the other. The established manners of every country are the standards of propriety with the people who have adopted them;...
Page 320 - Come muster, my lads, your mechanical tools, Your saws and your axes, your hammers and rules; Bring your mallets and planes, your level and line, And plenty of pins of American pine: For our roof we will raise, and our song still shall be, Our government firm, and our citizens free.
Page 156 - There is also another alleviation of the husband's distress ; he generally has the privilege of a small room or closet for his books and papers, the key of which he is allowed to keep. This is considered as a privileged place, and stands like the land of Goshen amid the plagues of Egypt.
Page 321 - Our king-posts are judges; how upright they stand, Supporting the braces, the laws of the land The laws of the land, which divide right from wrong, And strengthen the weak, by weak'ning the strong: For our roof we will raise, and our song still shall be, Laws equal and just for a people that's free.
Page 151 - ... putting the key in his pocket, betakes himself to flight A husband, however beloved, becomes a perfect nuisance during this season of female rage. His authority is superseded, his commission suspended, and the very scullion who cleans the brasses in the kitchen becomes of more importance than him.
Page 154 - ... the super-incumbent weight cracks the lower glass but this is of no importance. A valuable picture is placed leaning against the sharp corner of a table; others are made to lean against that, till the pressure of the whole forces the corner of the table through...

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