Diné: A History of the Navajos

Front Cover
UNM Press, 2002 - History - 386 pages
3 Reviews

This comprehensive narrative traces the history of the Navajos from their origins to the beginning of the twenty-first century. Based on extensive archival research, traditional accounts, interviews, historic and contemporary photographs, and firsthand observation, it provides a detailed, up-to-date portrait of the Diné past and present that will be essential for scholars, students, and interested general readers, both Navajo and non-Navajo.

As Iverson points out, Navajo identity is rooted in the land bordered by the four sacred mountains. At the same time, the Navajos have always incorporated new elements, new peoples, and new ways of doing things. The author explains how the Diné remember past promises, recall past sacrifices, and continue to build upon past achievements to construct and sustain North America's largest native community. Provided is a concise and provocative analysis of Navajo origins and their relations with the Spanish, with other Indian communities, and with the first Anglo-Americans in the Southwest. Following an insightful account of the traumatic Long Walk era and of key developments following the return from exile at Fort Sumner, the author considers the major themes and events of the twentieth century, including political leadership, livestock reduction, the Code Talkers, schools, health care, government, economic development, the arts, and athletics.

  

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Review: Diné: A History of the Navajos

User Review  - Jafer Martin - Goodreads

The is the most comprehensive history of the Dine I've encountered. It shows both sides of issues, and seems fairly objective also... I was given this book when I completed a year of teaching in ... Read full review

Review: Diné: A History of the Navajos

User Review  - Kathryn - Goodreads

Excellent overview of 20th Century Navajo History. Iverson is masterful at balancing objective scholarship with a genuine emotional attachment to his subject matter. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
To 1846
7
Sis Naajini Blanca Peak Colorado 9 Sacred Mountain of the South Tsoodzil Mount Taylor New Mexico
9
Dookoooshid San Francisco Peaks Arizona 20 Sacred Mountain of the North Dibe Nitsaa Hesperus Peak Colorado
10
Dzil Naoodil ii Huerfano Mountain
23
New Mexico 25 Cliff Palace Mesa Verde Colorado
25
White House Ruins Canyon de Chelly
27
Canyon de Chelly
30
Tom Torlino after three years at Carlisle
85
Chee Dodge as a young
87
Bilii Liziinii Black Horse a leading resistance figure with Taijoni
89
Faculty staff and students at the Fort Defiance boarding school
92
19011923
97
Part of the Shiprock Agency near Sheltons hotel
111
The chicken pull forerunner of Navajo rodeo
127
19231941
137

Portfolio of color photographs by Monty Roessel follows page
34
18461868
35
following page 34 Portfolio of color photographs by Monty Roessel 45 Manuelito Navajo resistance leader
45
The Hopi village of Walpi
56
The Dine at Hweeldi Fort Sumner New Mexico
58
Barboncito leading negotiator of the 1868 Treaty
61
18681901
66
Navajo delegation to Washington D C
70
Map 3 Boundaries of the Navajo Nation
72
Navajo silversmith and young girl
80
Tom Torlino upon arrival at Carlisle Indian Industrial School
84
19411962
180
19621982
227
Portfolio of color photographs by Monty Roessel follows page
258
19822002
274
Conclusion
317
Treaty of 1868
325
Notes
335
Selected Readings
365
Index
377
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Peter Iverson, Regents' Professor of History at Arizona State University, is the author of twelve books in American Indian history.

Monty Roessel (Navajo), an outstanding photographer, is Executive Director of the Rough Rock Community School. He has written and provided photographs for award-winning books for young people

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