Spin

Front Cover
Macmillan, Apr 1, 2005 - Fiction - 364 pages
851 Reviews
One night in October when he was ten years old, Tyler Dupree stood in his back yard and watched the stars go out. They all flared into brilliance at once, then disappeared, replaced by a flat, empty black barrier. He and his best friends, Jason and Diane Lawton, had seen what became known as the Big Blackout. It would shape their lives.

The effect is worldwide. The sun is now a featureless disk--a heat source, rather than an astronomical object. The moon is gone, but tides remain. Not only have the world's artificial satellites fallen out of orbit, their recovered remains are pitted and aged, as though they'd been in space far longer than their known lifespans. As Tyler, Jason, and Diane grow up, space probe reveals a bizarre truth: The barrier is artificial, generated by huge alien artifacts. Time is passing faster outside the barrier than inside--more than a hundred million years per day on Earth. At this rate, the death throes of the sun are only about forty years in our future.

Jason, now a promising young scientist, devotes his life to working against this slow-moving apocalypse. Diane throws herself into hedonism, marrying a sinister cult leader who's forged a new religion out of the fears of the masses.

Earth sends terraforming machines to Mars to let the onrush of time do its work, turning the planet green. Next they send humans...and immediately get back an emissary with thousands of years of stories to tell about the settling of Mars. Then Earth's probes reveal that an identical barrier has appeared around Mars. Jason, desperate, seeds near space with self-replicating machines that will scatter copies of themselves outward from the sun--and report back on what they find.

Life on Earth is about to get much, much stranger.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
297
4 stars
347
3 stars
154
2 stars
41
1 star
12

The plot is evolved at a very reasonable pace. - Goodreads
The style of writing is often times frustrating. - Goodreads
Great premise, well written. - Goodreads
Decent, well researched hard sci-fi. - Goodreads
Ending is odd and a bit muddled. - Goodreads
Great story telling. - Goodreads

Review: Spin (Spin Saga #1)

User Review  - Andrew - Goodreads

I found this book very engaging. I liked the switching from past to future story lines, and I loved everything to do with Mars and the plan of action taken by Earth. I found the big "reveal" to be ... Read full review

Review: Spin (Spin Saga #1)

User Review  - Ian - Goodreads

Well written, dramatic, and innovative on the fictionalized science front. It's five star sci-fi. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
12
Section 2
22
Section 3
37
Section 4
45
Section 5
49
Section 6
64
Section 7
88
Section 8
100
Section 16
208
Section 17
219
Section 18
238
Section 19
244
Section 20
264
Section 21
278
Section 22
284
Section 23
294

Section 9
112
Section 10
121
Section 11
140
Section 12
156
Section 13
167
Section 14
179
Section 15
192
Section 24
306
Section 25
319
Section 26
327
Section 27
360
Section 28
363
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Born in California, Robert Charles Wilson lives in Toronto. Darwinia won Canada's Aurora Award, The Chronoliths won the John W. Campbell Award, and Blind Lake is a New York Times Notable Book. All three were Hugo finalists.

Bibliographic information