Exercises in Elocution: Exemplifying the Rules and Principles of the Art of Reading (Google eBook)

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Jenks and Palmer, 1841 - Elocution - 240 pages
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Page 60 - And this is in the night. Most glorious night ! Thou wert not sent for slumber! let me be A sharer in thy fierce and far delight A portion of the tempest and of thee!
Page 55 - I conjure you, by that which you profess. (Howe'er you come to know it,) answer me: Though you untie the winds, and let them fight Against the churches: though the yesty waves Confound and swallow navigation up ; Though bladed corn be lodg'd, and trees blown down ; Though castles topple on their warders...
Page 162 - Ye winds, that have made me your sport, Convey to this desolate shore Some cordial endearing report Of a land I shall visit no more. My friends, do they now and then send A wish or a thought after me ? Oh, tell me I yet have a friend, Though a friend I am never to see.
Page 156 - Now came still Evening on, and Twilight gray Had in her sober livery all things clad : Silence accompanied ; for beast and bird, They to their grassy couch, these to their nests, Were slunk, all but the wakeful nightingale ; She all night long her amorous descant sung...
Page 162 - How fleet is a glance of the mind ! Compared with the speed of its flight, The tempest itself lags behind, And the swift-winged arrows of light When I think of my own native land In a moment I seem to be there; But alas! recollection at hand Soon hurries me back to despair.
Page 53 - Tis morn, but scarce yon level sun Can pierce the war-clouds, rolling dun, Where furious Frank and fiery Hun Shout in their sulphurous canopy. The combat deepens. On, ye brave, Who rush to glory, or the grave ! Wave, Munich ! all thy banners wave, And charge with all thy chivalry...
Page 125 - Haste thee, nymph, and bring with thee Jest, and youthful Jollity, Quips, and cranks,* and wanton* wiles, Nods, and becks, and wreathed smiles, Such as hang on Hebe's cheek, And love to live in dimple sleek; Sport that wrinkled Care derides, And Laughter holding both his sides. Come,- and trip it as you go On the light fantastic toe...
Page 24 - I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas, than to wring From the hard hands of peasants their vile trash, By any indirection. I did send To you for gold to pay my legions. Which you denied me...
Page 122 - twas wild. But thou, O Hope ! with eyes so fair, What was thy delighted measure ? Still it whisper'd promis'd pleasure, And bade the lovely scenes at distance hail.
Page 66 - Homer was the greater genius; Virgil, the better artist; in the one, we most admire the man; in. the other, the work. Homer hurries us with a commanding impetuosity; Virgil leads us with an attractive majesty. Homer scatters with a generous profusion; Virgil bestows with a careful magnificence. Homer, like the Nile, pours out his riches with a sudden overflow; Virgil, like a river in its banks, with a constant stream.

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