Love's Labour's Lost

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Oxford University Press, 1998 - Drama - 263 pages
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Love's Labour's Lost, now recognized as one of the most delightful and stageworthy of Shakespeare's comedies, came into its own both on the stage and in critical esteem only during the 1930s and 1940s, after three hundred years of neglect by the theatre and undervaluation and misuse by critics. The Introduction to this new edition pays particular attention to this process of rehabilitation. The text, based on the quarto of 1598 and taking full account of the extensive scholarly study thattext has received over recent years, rests on the hypothesis that the quarto goes back, probably by way of `lost' quarto, to an authorial manuscript representing the play in a state prior to `fair copy'. If this is so, the quarto takes on a special significance because through it we can watch Shakespeare in the act of composition, improvising, changing his mind, and revising as his play develops under his hand. The editor offers a number of new readings of difficult and disputed passages, together with some suggestions about the way in which the play's notorious `tangles' may have come about. A detailed commentary offers full and helpful guidance to the play's scintillating language.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
The Play
12
The Date and Sources
42
The Text
57
EDITORIAL PROCEDURES
85
Abbreviations and References
86
Loves Labours Lost
91
TWO FALSE STARTS
237
ALTERATIONS TO LINEATION
239
A NOTE ON THE MUSIC By John Caldwell
242
THE NAME OF ARMADOS PAGE
245
INDEX
247
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

The late George Hibbard was Emeritus Professor of English at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

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