Plutarch's Lives (Volume 1 of 2) (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2009 - Biography & Autobiography - 560 pages
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"Lives" is a series of biographies of famous Greeks and Romans by the ancient Greek historian Plutarch who lived during the first and second century AD. "Lives" consists of twenty-three paired biographies, one Greek and one Roman, and four unpaired, which explore the influence of character on the lives and destinies of the subjects. Rather than providing strictly historical accounts, Plutarch was most concerned with capturing this issue of character. This volume, volume 1 of 2, contains the first half of this classic history in which you will find the biographies of the following persons: Theseus, Romulus, Lycurgus, Numa Pompilius, Solon, Poplicola, Themistocles, Camillus, Pericles, Fabius, Alcibiades, Coriolanus, Timoleon, Æmilius Paulus, Pelopidas, Marcellus, Aristides, Marcus Cato, Philop men, Flamininus, Pyrrhus, Caius Marius, Lysander, Sylla, Cimon, Lucullus, Nicias, and Crassus.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gmicksmith - LibraryThing

Plutarch's best-known work is the Parallel Lives, a series of biographies of famous Greeks and Romans, arranged in pairs to illuminate their common moral virtues and vices. The surviving Lives contain ... Read full review

Review: Lives, Vol 2, Part 2

User Review  - Rhett Talley - Goodreads

Elegant moral biography... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

THESEUS
5
ROMULUS
23
COMPARISON OF ROMULUS WITH THESEUS
41
LYCURGUS
43
NUMA POMPILIUS
64
COMPARISON OF NUMA WITH LYCURGUS
79
SOLON
82
POPLICOLA
100
MARCELLUS
304
COMPARISION OF PELOPIDAS WITH MARCELLUS
321
ARISTIDES
323
MARCUS CATO
340
COMPARISON OF ARISTIDES WITH MARCUS CATO
356
PHILOPŒMEN
359
FLAMININUS
370
COMPARISON OF PHILOPŒMEN WITH FLAMININUS
384

COMPARISON OF POPLICOLA WITH SOLON
110
THEMISTOCLES
112
CAMILLUS
130
PERICLES
152
FABIUS
178
COMPARISON OF PERICLES WITH FABIUS
193
ALCIBIADES
195
CORIOLANUS
219
COMPARISON OF ALCIBIADES WITH CORIOLANUS
241
TIMOLEON
244
ÆMILIUS PAULUS
266
COMPARISON OF TIMOLEON WITH ÆMILIUS PAULUS
286
PELOPIDAS
287
PYRRHUS
385
CAIUS MARIUS
407
LYSANDER
432
SYLLA
449
COMPARISON OF LYSANDER WITH SYLLA
472
CIMON
475
LUCULLUS
488
COMPARISON OF LUCULLUS WITH CIMON
514
NICIAS
515
CRASSUS
535
COMPARISON OF CRASSUS WITH NICIAS
555
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About the author (2009)

PLUTARCH. c.46--c.125 Considered by many to be the most important Greek writer of the early Roman period, Plutarch was a member of a well-to-do Greek family, a chief magistrate, a priest at Delphi, and an exceptionally well-read individual. His philosophical views were based on those of Plato and, although a Greek, he esteemed the achievements and attributes of the Romans. By the time Plutarch's works were published for the first time in the eleventh century, some had already been lost. He wrote innumerable essays on philosophical, historical, political, religious, and literary subjects, 78 of which survive today and are known collectively as the "Moralia." He is known primarily, however, for his Parallel Lives of Greeks and Romans, which consists of 50 biographies---23 of prominent Greeks, 23 of Roman leaders, and 4 separate lives---accompanied at intervals by short comparative essays. Although historical information is included in the work, Plutarch wrote it originally to inspire emulation in youth, so the emphasis is on character, moral choice, and anecdote. Sir Thomas North's 1579 translation into English of Parallel Lives became an important source for William Shakespeare which he used for three plays, Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus.

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