A vindication of natural society, or, A view of the miseries and evils arising to mankind from every species of artificial society: in a letter to Lord **** by a late noble writer

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Liberty Classics, 1982 - Political Science - 105 pages
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This is a new edition of Edmund Burke's first work, originally issued anonymously in 1756 as a letter attributed to 'a late noble writer'. In 1757 Burke produced a revised version with a new preface but still did not attach his name to the work. This Liberty Fund edition is based on the 1757 revision. The 'Vindication' is a political and social satire ridiculing the popular enlightenment notion of a pre-civil 'natural society'.

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Review: A Vindication of Natural Society

User Review  - Lance Kinzer - Goodreads

Among the greatest satires in the English language in my humble opinion. Read full review

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About the author (1982)

Born in Ireland in 1729, Edmund Burke was an English statesman, author, and orator who is best remembered as a formidable advocate for those who were victims of injustice. He was the son of a Dublin lawyer and had also trained to practice law. In the 1760s, Burke was elected to the House of Commons from the Whig party. Burke spent most of his career in Parliament as a member of the Royal Opposition, who was not afraid of controversy, as shown by his support for the American Revolution and for Irish/Catholic rights. His best-known work is Reflections on the French Revolution (1790). Some other notable works are On Conciliation with the American Colonies (1775) and Impeachment of Warren Hastings (1788). Edmund Burke died in 1797.

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