Yerkes Observatory, 1892-1950: The Birth, Near Death, and Resurrection of a Scientific Research Institution (Google eBook)

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University of Chicago Press, Apr 15, 2008 - Science - 394 pages
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Drawing on his experience as historian of astronomy, practicing astrophysicist, and director of Lick Observatory, Donald Osterbrock uncovers a chapter in the history of astronomy by providing the story of the Yerkes Observatory.

"An excellent description of the ups and downs of a major observatory."—Jack Meadows, Nature

"Historians are much indebted to Osterbrock for this new contribution to the fascinating story of twentieth-century American astronomy."—Adriaan Blaauw, Journal for the History of Astronomy

"An important reference about one of the key American observatories of this century."—Woodruff T. Sullivan III, Physics Today
  

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Yerkes Observatory, 1892-1950: the birth, near death, and resurrection of a scientific research institution

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In 1997, the Yerkes Observatory will celebrate its 100th anniversary. Osterbrock (Pauper and Prince: Ritchey, Hale & Big American Telescopes, Univ. of Arizona, 1993) is eminently qualified to write ... Read full review

Contents

1 Birth 1868897
1
2 Infancy 18971904
25
3 Near Death 19041932
47
4 The Savior 18971931
77
5 The Boy President 19291932
107
6 The Boy Director 19321936
133
7 Resurrection on the Campus and at Yerkes 18931937
159
8 Birth of McDonald Observatory 19331939
187
10 World War II 19391945
245
11 Golden Years 19451950
267
12 Epilogue To the Centennial 19501997
303
Abbreviations Used in Notes and Bibliography
325
Notes
329
Bibliography
363
Index
367
Copyright

9 An Extraordinarily Fine Group 19361942
211

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Page ix - My father's columns and papers are now held at the Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin. In the present volume, his articles appear as originally published, with no substantive changes. Since his editors sometimes were inconsistent in spelling a word such as "programming," I have reconciled these discrepancies.
Page ix - ... 29, 1946, he married German-born Hertha Sponer, a physicist at Duke University who had been one or his assistants in Göttingen. In 1951, Franck was awarded the Planck Medal, and in 1953 he received honorary citizenship from the city of Göttingen, where he died during a visit. [Franck's papers are in the special collections department of the Regenstein Library at the University of Chicago. Other letters and an extensive oral history interview are included in the collections housed in various...

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