The True Doctrine of State Rights: With an Examination of the Record of the Democratic and Republican Parties in Connection with Slavery (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Jameson & Morse, Printers, 1880 - Political parties - 83 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 7 - ... in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states, who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose, for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits, the authorities, rights, and liberties appertaining to them.
Page 38 - There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory otherwise than in the punishment of crimes, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted; Provided, always, That any person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor or service as aforesaid.
Page 7 - That the good people of this commonwealth, having ever felt, and continuing to feel the most sincere affection for their brethren of the other States ; the truest anxiety for establishing and perpetuating the Union of all ; and the most scrupulous fidelity to that Constitution, -which is the pledge of mutual friendship, and the instrument of mutual happiness...
Page 74 - I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor...
Page 22 - If there should happen to be an irreconcilable variance between the two, that which has the superior obligation and validity ought, of course, to be preferred : in other words, the constitution ought to be preferred to the statute ; the intention of the people to the intention of their agents.
Page 80 - That the principle and construction contended for by sundry of the state legislatures, that the general government is the exclusive judge of the extent of the powers delegated to it, stop nothing short of despotismó since the discretion of those who administer the government, and not the Constitution, would be the measure of their powers...
Page 5 - States, to devise such further provisions as shall appear to them necessary to render the constitution of the federal government adequate to the exigencies of the union...
Page 13 - In America the powers of sovereignty are divided between the government of the Union and those of the States. They are each sovereign with respect to the objects committed to it, and neither sovereign with respect to the objects committed to the other.
Page 22 - The interpretation of the laws is the proper and peculiar province of the courts. A constitution is, in fact, and must be regarded by the judges, as a fundamental law. It therefore belongs to them to ascertain its meaning, as well as the meaning of any particular act proceeding from the legislative body.
Page 74 - I acknowledge the fact. When it is said that the institution exists and that it is very difficult to get rid of it in any satisfactory way, I can understand and appreciate the saying. I surely will not blame them for not doing what I should not know how to do myself.

Bibliographic information