Eccentric biography, or, Memoirs of remarkable characters, ancient and modern: including potentates, statesmen, divines, historians, naval and military heroes, philosophers, lawyers, impostors, poets, painters, players, dramatic writers, misers, &c. &c. &c. : the whole alphabetically arranged : forming a pleasing delineation of the singularity, whim, folly, caprice, &c. of the human mind (Google eBook)

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B. & J. Homans, 1804 - Social Science - 344 pages
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Page 163 - Johnson said, he thought he had already done his part as a writer. "I should have thought so too," said the king, " if you had not written so well.
Page 44 - Wilt thou leave thy sins and go to heaven, or have thy sins and go to hell...
Page 164 - Sir, she had read the old romances, and had got into her head the fantastical notion that a woman of spirit should use her lover like a dog. So, sir, at first she told me that I rode too fast, and she could not keep up with me, and, when I rode a little slower, she passed me, and complained that I lagged behind. I was not to be made the slave of caprice; and I resolved to begin as I meant to end. I therefore pushed on briskly, till I was fairly out of her sight.
Page 289 - This ill-starred, good-natured, improvident man returned to Dublin, unhinged from all favour at court, and even banished from the castle. But still he remained a punster, a fiddler, and a wit. Not a day passed without a rebus, an anagram, or a madrigal. His pen, and his fiddlestick, were in continual motion, and yet to little or no purpose, if we may give credit to the following lines, which shall serve as a conclusion of his poetical character.
Page 104 - The first time I was in company with Foote was at Fitzherbert's. Having no good opinion of the fellow, I was resolved not to be pleased; and it is very difficult to please a man against his will. I went on eating my dinner pretty sullenly, affecting not to mind him. But the dog was so very comical, that I was obliged to lay down my knife and fork, throw myself back upon my chair, and fairly laugh it out. No, Sir, he was irresistible.
Page 269 - The commencement of this benevolence is very honourable to Quin, who is reported to have delivered Thomson, then known to him only for his genius, from an arrest, by a very considerable present ; and its continuance is honourable to both ; for friendship is not always the sequel of obligation.
Page 165 - ... fantastical notion that a woman of spirit should use her lover like a dog. So, Sir, at first she told me that I rode too fast, and she could not keep up with me; and, when I rode a little slower, she passed me, and complained that I lagged behind. I was not to be made the slave of caprice; and I resolved to begin as I meant to end. I therefore pushed on briskly, till I was fairly out of her sight. The road lay between two hedges, so I was sure she could not miss it; and I contrived that she should...
Page 324 - His time was regularly spent in reading, meditation, and prayer. No Carthusian monk was ever more constant and rigid in his abstinence. His plain garb, his long and silver beard, his mortified and venerable aspect, bespoke him an ancient inhabitant of the desert, rather than a gentleman of fortune in a populous city.
Page 90 - ... of accounts, and never reduced his affairs to writing, he was obliged, in the disposal of his money, to trust much to memory, and still more to the suggestions of others.
Page 29 - ... confessed he adopted the eastern method, by which camels are made to dance, by heating the floor. In the course of six months' teaching, he made a turtle fetch and carry like a dog; and having chalked the floor and blackened its claws, could direct it to trace out any given name in the company.

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