The Shi'is of Iraq

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Princeton University Press, 2003 - History - 312 pages
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The Shi'is of Iraq provides a comprehensive history of Iraq's majority group and its turbulent relations with the ruling Sunni minority. Yitzhak Nakash challenges the widely held belief that Shi'i society and politics in Iraq are a reflection of Iranian Shi'ism, pointing to the strong Arab attributes of Iraqi Shi'ism. He contends that behind the power struggle in Iraq between Arab Sunnis and Shi'is there exist two sectarian groups that are quite similar. The tension fueling the sectarian problem between Sunnis and Shi'is is political rather than ethnic or cultural, and it reflects the competition of the two groups over the right to rule and to define the meaning of nationalism in Iraq. A new introduction brings this book into the new century and illuminates the role that Shi`is could play in postwar Iraq.

  

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Contents

VII
13
VIII
14
IX
18
X
25
XI
43
XII
49
XIII
50
XIV
55
XXXII
163
XXXIII
164
XXXIV
173
XXXV
184
XXXVI
185
XXXVII
192
XXXVIII
197
XXXIX
203

XV
61
XVI
66
XVII
73
XVIII
75
XIX
88
XX
94
XXI
100
XXII
105
XXIII
109
XXIV
120
XXV
125
XXVI
132
XXVII
139
XXVIII
141
XXIX
142
XXX
154
XXXI
157
XL
205
XLI
206
XLII
211
XLIII
229
XLIV
238
XLV
241
XLVI
247
XLVII
262
XLVIII
269
XLIX
273
L
283
LI
285
LII
287
LIII
289
LIV
303
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About the author (2003)

Yitzhak Nakash is associate professor of Middle Eastern and Islamic studies at Brandeis University. The author of "The Shi'is of Iraq" (Princeton), he has contributed articles to "Foreign Affairs, Newsweek," and the "New York Times.

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