The Plays of William Shakespeare in Ten Volumes: With Corrections and Illustrations of Various Commentators, Volume 9 (Google eBook)

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C. Bathurst, 1778
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Page 357 - The mysteries of Hecate, and the night; By all the operations of the orbs, . From whom we do exist, and cease to be ; Here I disclaim all my paternal care, Propinquity and property of blood, And as a stranger to my heart and me Hold thee, from this, for ever.
Page 92 - Time hath, my lord, a wallet at his back, Wherein he puts alms for oblivion, A great-sized monster of ingratitudes : Those scraps are good deeds past : which are devour'd As fast as they are made, forgot as soon As done...
Page 517 - tis, to cast one's eyes so low! The crows and choughs, that wing the midway air, Show scarce so gross as beetles : Half way down Hangs one that gathers samphire; dreadful trade! Methinks, he seems no bigger than his head: The fishermen, that walk upon the beach, Appear like mice; and yon...
Page 564 - Kent. Vex not his ghost. O, let him pass! He hates him That would upon the rack of this tough world Stretch him out longer.
Page 527 - Thou must be patient; we came crying hither. Thou know'st, the first time that we smell the air, We wawl, and cry : — I will preach to thee ; mark me. Glo. Alack, alack the day! Lear. When we are born, we cry, that we are come To this great stage of fools...
Page 546 - I'll kneel down, And ask of thee forgiveness. So we'll live, And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh At gilded butterflies, and hear poor rogues Talk of court news ; and we'll talk with them too, Who loses, and who wins ; who's in, who's out ; And take...
Page 537 - tis fittest. Cor. How does my royal lord? How fares your majesty? Lear. You do me wrong, to take me out o' the grave. — Thou art a soul in bliss ; but I am bound Upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears Do scald like molten lead.
Page 379 - ... we make guilty of our disasters the sun the moon and the stars ; as if we were villains by necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion, knaves thieves and treachers by spherical predominance, drunkards liars and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence, and all that we are evil in by a divine thrusting on: an admirable evasion of whoremaster man, to lay his goatish disposition to the charge of a star!
Page 447 - And let not women's weapons, water-drops, Stain my man's cheeks !— No, you unnatural hags, I will have such revenges on you both, That all the world shall — I will do such things — What they are yet I know not ; but they shall be The terrors of the earth. You think I'll weep ; No, I'll not weep : — • I have full cause of weeping ; but this heart Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws, Or ere I'll weep : — O, fool, I shall go mad ! {Exeunt LEAR, GLOSTER, KENT, and Fool.
Page 93 - ... hand; And with his arms outstretch'd, as he would fly, Grasps in the comer: welcome ever smiles, And farewell goes out sighing. O, let not virtue seek Remuneration for the thing it was: For beauty, wit, High birth, vigour of bone, desert in service, Love, friendship, charity, are subjects all To envious and calumniating time. One touch of nature makes the whole world kin— That all, with one consent, praise new-born gawds, Though they are made and moulded of things past, And give to dust that...

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Internet Archive: Details: The plays of William Shakespeare in ten ...
The plays of William Shakespeare in ten volumes, with corrections and illustrations of various commentators (Volume 9) (1778) ...
www.archive.org/ details/ playsofwilliamsh09shakiala

Shakespeare's Editors - Steevens
The plays of William Shakespeare in ten volumes, with corrections and illustrations of various commentators; to which are added Notes by Samuel Johnson and ...
shakespeare.palomar.edu/ Editors/ Steevens.htm

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