Day Hiking Mount Rainier: National Park Trails

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The Mountaineers Books, 2008 - Sports & Recreation - 227 pages
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The tallest mountain in the Cascade Range has long beckoned hikers to its many trails. Compact, portable, and beautifully packaged, this brand new guide to Washington's iconic peak is for the modern hiker, presenting more convenient organization along the mountain's travel corridors, with an emphasis on trails that are 12 miles or less, round-trip. Day Hiking Mount Rainier provides the most thorough coverage of Mount Rainier National Park to date, including the park's four main entrances?Nisqually, Carbon River, White River/Sunrise, and Stevens Canyon/Ohanapecosh?as well as Cayuse Pass and Highway 123, the Grove of the Patriarchs, Camp Muir, parts of the Wonderland Trail, Longmire, and Paradise. The Hikes-at-a-Glance chart helps hikers choose a route quickly based on trail features. Nearby camping options are included, plus info on how to extend your hike, a full-color photo insert and overview map, quick-reference icons for kids, dogs, views, and much more.
  

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Contents

1 Paul Peak
43
2 Tolmie Peak Lookout
45
3 Spray Park
47
4 Mowich River
49
5 Green Lake
52
6 Chenuis Falls
55
7 Carbon River Rain Nature Trail
56
8 Carbon Glacier
58
37 Shriner Peak
136
38 Laughingwater Creek to Three Lakes
138
39 Ohanapecosh Hot Springs
140
40 Silver Falls Loop
142
stevens canyon
145
41 Grove of the Patriarchs Loop
146
42 Olallie Creek Camp
149
43 Box Canyon and Nickel Creek
151

9 Moraine ParkMystic Lake
62
10 Ipsut Falls
64
11Oneway
66
12 Seattle Park
68
13 Yellowstone Cliffs and Windy Gap
71
white river
75
14 Grand Park
76
15 Crystal Lakes
79
16 Crystal Peak
81
17 Owyhigh Lakes
84
18 Panhandle Gap
86
19 Glacier Basin
89
20 Emmons Glacier View
92
30 White River to Sunrise
94
22 Sunrise Lake
98
23 Palisades Lakes
99
24 Sourdough Ridge
102
25 Fremont Lookout
105
26 Berkeley Park
107
27 Skyscraper Mountain
109
28 Burroughs Mountain
112
29 Shadow LakeSunrise Camp Loop
115
30 Forest Lake
117
31 Dege Peak
119
32 Silver ForestEmmons Vista
122
cayuse pass
125
33 Tipsoo LakeNaches Peak Loop
126
34 Deer Creek Falls
128
35 Deer Creek Falls to Owyhigh Lakes
131
36 Deer Creek to Tipsoo Lake
133
44 Indian BarCowlitz Divide
153
45 Stevens Canyon Waterfalls
156
46 Bench and Snow Lakes
158
47 Louise Lake
161
48 Faraway Rock
165
49 Pinnacle Saddle
167
50 Mount Belijica
172
51 Gobblers Knob
174
52 Glacier View
177
53 Kautz Creek
179
54 Twin Firs Loop
182
55 Eagle Peak
183
56 Trail of the Shadows
186
57 Rampart Ridge Loop
188
58 Pyramid Creek Camp
192
59 Indian Henrys Hunting Ground
193
60 Carter Falls
196
61 Comet Falls
198
62 Van Trump Park
200
63 Narada Falls to Reflection Lakes
204
64 Nisqually Vista Loop
206
65 AltaVista Loop
208
66 Golden Gate
211
67 Mazama Ridge
212
68 Skyline Trail Loop
215
69 Glacier VistaPanorama Point
219
70 Camp Muir
221
Conservation and Trail Organizations
224
Index
225
Copyright

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Page 22 - The weather was serene and pleasant, and the country continued to exhibit, between us and the eastern snowy range, the same luxuriant appearance. At its northern extremity, mount Baker bore by compass N. 22 E. ; the round snowy mountain, now forming its southern extremity, and which, after my friend Rear Admiral Rainier, I distinguished by the name of MOUNT RAINIER, bore N. [S.] 42 E.
Page 36 - ... water sources, be sure to include some method of purification, whether a chemical additive, such as iodine, or a filtration device. 10. Emergency shelter: This can be as simple as a few extra-large garbage bags or something more efficient, such as a reflective space blanket or tube tent. TRAILHEAD CONCERNS Sadly, the topic of trailhead and trail crime must be addressed. As urban areas continuously encroach upon our green spaces, societal ills follow along. But by and large, our hiking trails...
Page 36 - ... order. This is true for all hikers, but particularly so for solo hikers. (Solo hiking sparks much debate over whether it is prudent or not. I hike solo 90 percent of the time, reaping rewards of deep reflection, self-determination, and a complete wilderness experience. You must decide for yourself) Be aware of your surroundings at all times. Leave your itinerary with someone back home. If something doesn't feel right, it probably isn't. Take action by leaving the place or situation immediately....
Page 37 - ... clothes inside. Save yourself the hassle of returning to a busted window by not giving criminals a reason to clout your car. If you arrive at a trailhead and someone looks suspicious, don't discount your intuition. Take notes on the person and his or her vehicle. Record the license plate and report the behavior to the authorities. Don't confront the person. Leave and go to another trail. While most car break-ins are crimes of opportunity, organized bands intent on stealing IDs have also been...
Page 37 - Carbreak-ins, sadly, are a fartoo common occurrence at some of our trailheads. Do not absolutely under no circumstances leave anything of value in your vehicle while out hiking. Take your wallet, cell phone, and listening devices with you, or better yet, don't bring them along in the first place. Don't leave anything in your car that may appear valuable. A duffle bag on the back seat may contain dirty T-shirts, but a thief may think there's a laptop in it. Save yourself the hassle of returning...
Page 37 - ... intuition. Take notes on the person and his or her vehicle. Record the license plate and report the behavior to the authorities. Don't confront the person. Leave and go to another trail. While most car break-ins are crimes of opportunity, organized bands intent on stealing IDs have also been known to target parked cars at trailheads. While some trailheads are regularly targeted and others rarely if at all, there's no sure way of preventing this from happening to you other than being dropped off...
Page 31 - When meeting other hikers, the uphill group has the right-ofway. There are two general reasons for this. First, on steep ascents hikers may be watching the trail and not notice the approach of descending hikers until they are face-to-face. More importantly, it is easier for descending hikers to break their stride and step off the trail than it is for those who have gotten into a good, climbing rhythm. But by all means if you are the uphill trekker and you wish to grant passage to oncoming hikers,...
Page 37 - ... no circumstances leave anything of value in your vehicle while out hiking. Take your wallet, cell phone, and listening devices with you, or better yet, don't bring them along in the first place. Don't leave anything in your car that may appear valuable. A duffle bag on the back seat may contain dirty T-shirts, but a thief may think there's a laptop in it. If you do leave a duffle of clothes in the car, unzip it so prowlers can see that it does indeed just have clothes inside.
Page 31 - ... stride and step off the trail than it is for those who have gotten into a good, climbing rhythm. But by all means if you are the uphill trekker and you wish to grant passage to oncoming hikers, go right ahead with this act of trail kindness. Moving off-trail. When meeting other user groups (like bicyclists or horseback riders), the hiker should move off the trail. This is because hikers are more mobile and flexible than other users, making it easier for them to step off the trail. Encountering...
Page 28 - But sound wilderness ethics go deeper than that, beyond simply picking up after ourselves when we go fora hike. Wilderness ethics must carry over into our daily lives. We need to ensure that our elected officials and public land managers recognize and respond to our wilderness needs and desires. If we hike the trails on the weekend, but let the wilderness go neglected orworse, allow it to be abused on the weekdays, we'll soon find ourweekend haunts diminished or destroyed. TRAIL GIANTS I...

About the author (2008)

Craig Romano is an avid hiker, runner, kayacker, and cyclist. He is the author of Best Hikes with Dogs Inland Northwest, Columbia Highlands: Exploring Washington's Last Frontier, as well as Backpacking Washington,Day Hiking Columbia River Gorge,Day Hiking Olympia Peninsula, Day Hiking: North Cascades, Day Hiking Central Cascades, and Winter Hikes of Western Washington Deck. Craig lives in Mount Vernon, Washington.Alan L. Bauer is a professional freelance photographer specializing in the natural history of the Pacific Northwest and coverage of local history. His work has been published in Backpacker, Northwest Runner, SportsEtc, Northwest Outdoors, Northwest Travel, and Oregon Coast magazines as well as The Tacoma News Tribune, The Bellingham Herald, and the Getaways weekly outdoor recreation magazine insert for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Alan also contributed photographs for the Washington titles in the new series Day Hiking. Learn more about Alan at, www.alanbauer.com

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