Keywords in Creative Writing

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Utah State University Press, Jan 15, 2006 - Education - 235 pages
1 Review

Wendy Bishop and David Starkey have created a remarkable resource volume for creative writing students and other writers just getting started. In two- to ten-page discussions, these authors introduce forty-one central concepts in the fields of creative writing and writing instruction, with discussions that are accessible yet grounded in scholarship and years of experience.

Keywords in Creative Writing provides a brief but comprehensive introduction to the field of creative writing through its landmark terms, exploring concerns as abstract as postmodernism and identity politics alongside very practical interests of beginning writers, like contests, agents, and royalties. This approach makes the book ideal for the college classroom as well as the writer’s bookshelf, and unique in the field, combining the pragmatic accessibility of popular writer’s handbooks, with a wider, more scholarly vision of theory and research.

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User Review  - ostrom - LibraryThing

This is a superb resource for anyone who teaches creative writing and for anyone starting graduate school in an MFA program. Read full review

Contents

Anthology
11
Chapbooks
25
Composition
36
Copyright

22 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2006)

Wendy Bishop, former Kellogg Hunt Professor of English at Florida State University, is the author or editor of a number of books, essays, and articles on composition and creative writing pedagogy and writing research, including Acts of Revision; The Subject Is Writing, Third Edition; The Subject Is Story; The Subject Is Research; and The Subject Is Reading, as well as Ethnographic Writing Research, Elements of Alternate Style, and In Praise of Pedagogy, all published by Boynton/Cook.

David Starkey is the Bye Fellow of Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge, and winner of the W. H. Smith Prize and the Norton Medlicott Medal for Services to History presented by Britain's Historical Association. He is best known for writing and presenting the groundbreaking and hugely popular series Elizabeth and The Six Wives of Henry VIII. He lives in London.

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