Chi Psi Purple and Gold, Volume 23 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Chi Psi Fraternity, 1906 - Greek letter societies
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Page 297 - ... young and inexperienced assistants," each of whom meets "each of his men for ten or fifteen minutes at a time about once a month." tg) The increasing dlsor der in the lecture-rooms comes "from large bodies of students who cannot hear the lecturer, or can hear him imperfectly." (h) The "fact that ambitious students find little incentive to take honors is one of the glaring failures of our system.
Page 300 - Third, to realize that in many ways they are their undergraduates' only hope for true individualism. Fourth, to co-operate in a large way with one another in the study and elimination of the too prevalent waste of lives during the college course. Fifth, to reach backward into the preparatory schools and clean up moral conditions there. Let the fraternities, as well as the colleges, be judged, not by wealth or age or numbers, but by the results which they work out in the lives of their individual...
Page 297 - This influence, whether good, bad, or indifferent, is dominant in many colleges. If our huge faculties cannot, like their smaller prototypes, closely touch the lives of their individual pupils, may not this be done through thoughtful alumni acting on the undergraduate members of their own fraternity, thereby greatly increasing the number of those who will pursue their college course earnestly and for its own sake...
Page 299 - ... every year. We, as the permanent body, have no right to furnish our undergraduates with fine and exclusive homes, and then shirk responsibility for the future conduct and influence of those homes. The proper government of a chapter is a strict one, with the power in the hands of the upper classmen, especially the seniors, who are in turn held strictly accountable to alumni who are in constant touch with the situation and personally acquainted with every undergraduate and his work and needs. Where...
Page 295 - ... secret societies have finally become students' clubs (representing part of the college endowment), in which their members eat and room and are largely relieved from all direct faculty control. Baird's Manual of American College Fraternities, sixth edition, 1905, gives full details of thirty-one general fraternities for men, with 179,351 graduate and undergraduate members, and 970 active and 379 dormant chapters; owning 290 houses and renting 368. Since 1883 the membership was almost trebled,...
Page 312 - This suggestion was novel only in its scope. Would it not be possible to go farther, and to place in chapter-houses, by the action and support of the graduates, young and promising graduate students, who, living with the men and acting as tutors, somewhat in the English sense, should direct the work of the undergraduates ; teach them how to study, an art in which American students are sadly lacking ; stimulate their intellectual life ; and in a familiar, informal way co-operate with the college in...
Page 354 - God in His infinite wisdom has seen fit to take from our midst our faithful secretary-treasurer and highly esteemed brother, Moris McHenry; therefore be it Resolved. That we, the members of Battle Creek Lodge 162.
Page 298 - ... fraternities are to-day great educational influences which furnish our most available means to raise the moral and mental tone of our colleges and universities and as well of our preparatory schools and to aid our sons and grandsons in a struggle against greater odds and temptations, and moral, social, and athletic distractions, than the older generations ever dreamed of.
Page 294 - ... hotel. The societies had little intercourse between their various chapters or between their active and graduate members. Their infrequent conventions consisted of a public address, and probably a poem, by prominent alumni, and a private banquet. The active members met as a body only once a week on lodge nights. Although the colleges were constantly asking for large sums to build dormitories, no one dreamed that the fraternities would largely solve this problem by housing their own members....
Page 294 - ... Kappa Alpha, some of which have confined their chapters to the South but most of which have spread north since. The Acacia Journal. In this connection it is interesting to note that Union College, Schenectady, NY, founded in 1795 has the distinction of being the birth place of Kappa Alpha, 1825 ; Sigma Phi, 1827, Delta Phi, 1827; Psi Upsilon, 1833; Chi Psi, 1841 and Theta Delta Chi, 1847 a record indeed for numbers founded at any single institution (Chi Phi Chakett). The nearest rival...

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