Baconian facts: an epilogue to the farce of "Bacon vs. Shakespeare." (Google eBook)

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Franklin P. Rice, 1890 - Drama - 24 pages
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Page 10 - Would he had blotted a thousand. Which they thought a malevolent speech. I had not told posterity this, but for their ignorance, who choose that circumstance to commend their friend by, wherein he most faulted ; and to justify mine own candour: for I loved the man, and do honour his memory, on this side idolatry, as much as any.
Page 9 - ... his mind and hand went together; and what he thought, he uttered with that easiness, that we have scarce received from him a blot in his papers.
Page 10 - I remember the players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing, whatsoever he penned, he never blotted out a line. My answer hath been, " Would he had blotted a thousand," which they thought a malevolent speech.
Page 19 - O, could he but have drawne his wit As well in brasse, as he hath hit His face; the Print would then surpasse All, that was ever writ in brasse. But, since he cannot, Reader, looke Not on his Picture, but his Booke.
Page 7 - ... reflecting all objects with its own convexities and concavities ; a perfectly level mirror ; that is to say withal, if we will understand it, a man justly related to all things and men, a good man.
Page 10 - We have but collected them, and done an office to the dead, to procure his orphans guardians; without ambition either of self-profit or fame; only to keep the memory of so worthy a friend and fellow alive as was our Shakespeare, by humble offer of his plays to your most noble patronage.
Page 13 - The most prodigious wit that ever I knew of my nation, and of this side of the sea, is of your lordship's name, though he be known by another.
Page 6 - Learning, that of Henry VII., that of the Essays, being retractate, and made more perfect, well translated into Latin by the help of some good pens, which forsake me not. For these modern languages will, at one time or other, play the bankrupts with books : and since I have lost much time with this age, I would be glad, as God shall give me leave, to recover it with posterity.
Page 10 - and do honor his memory on this side idolatry as much as any. He was indeed honest, and of an open and free nature...

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