The Poetical Works of Mark Akenside (Google eBook)

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William Pickering, 1835 - 303 pages
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Page 65 - For what the eternal Maker has ordain'd The powers of man : we feel within ourselves His energy divine : he tells the heart, He meant, he made us to behold and love What he beholds and loves, the general orb Of life and being ; to be great like him, , Beneficent and active.
Page 43 - Oh ! he will tell thee, that the wealth of worlds Should ne'er seduce his bosom to forego That sacred hour...
Page 7 - Imprints a different bias, and to each Decrees its province in the common toil. To some she taught the fabric of the sphere, The changeful Moon, the circuit of the stars, The golden zones of Heaven ; to some she gave To weigh the moment of eternal things, Of time, and space, and Fate's unbroken chain, And will's quick impulse : others by the hand She led o'er vales and mountains, to explore What healing virtue swells the tender veins Of herbs and flowers; or what the beams of morn Draw forth, distilling...
Page 6 - From Heaven my strains begin; from Heaven descends The flame of genius to the human breast, And love and beauty, and poetic joy And inspiration. Ere the radiant Sun Sprang from the east, or 'mid the vault of night The Moon suspended her serener lamp ; Ere mountains, woods, or streams, adorn'd the...
Page 11 - Rest at the fated goal. For from the birth Of mortal man, the Sovereign Maker said, That not in humble nor in brief delight, Not in the fading echoes of renown, Power's purple robes, nor pleasure's flowery lap, The soul should find enjoyment : but from these Turning disdainful to an equal good, Through all the ascent of things enlarge her view...
Page 8 - Imagination's tender frame, From nerve to nerve; all naked and alive They catch the spreading rays; till now the soul At length discloses every tuneful spring, To that harmonious movement from without Responsive.
Page 7 - Wisdom's mien celestial. From the first Of days on them his love divine he fixed, His admiration : till in time complete, What he admired, and loved, his vital smile Unfolded into being. Hence the breath Of life informing each organic frame ; Hence the green earth, and wild resounding waves ; Hence light and shade alternate; warmth and cold; And clear autumnal skies, and vernal showers; And all the fair variety of things.
Page 19 - Is aught so fair In all the dewy landscapes of the Spring, In the bright eye of Hesper or the Morn, In Nature's fairest forms, is aught so fair As virtuous Friendship ? as the candid blush Of him who strives with fortune to be just ? The graceful tear that streams for others...
Page 64 - Fresh pleasure only: for the attentive mind By this harmonious action on her powers Becomes herself harmonious: wont so oft In outward things to meditate the charm Of sacred order, soon she seeks at home To find a kindred order, to exert Within herself this elegance of love, This fair inspir'd delight: her temper'd powers Refine at length, and every passion wears A chaster, milder, more attractive mien.
Page 19 - O man ! does this capacious scene With half that kindling majesty dilate Thy strong conception, as when Brutus rose Refulgent from the stroke of Caesar's fate, Amid the crowd of patriots ; and his arm Aloft extending, like eternal Jove When guilt brings down the thunder, call'd aloud On Tully's name, and shook his crimson steel, And bade the father of his country hail ? For lo ! the tyrant prostrate on the dust, And Rome again is free...

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