A plea for teetotalism, and the Maine liquor law (Google eBook)

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William Tweedie, 1855 - 12 pages
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Page 165 - Then let us pray that come it may, As come it will for a' that; That sense and worth, o'er a' the earth, May bear the gree, and a' that. For a
Page 160 - During the second week, the flatness and insipidity of the water as drink was considerably abated ; and we found ourselves so much less thirsty than usual, that we took very little liquid except at our meals. We found the next Saturday and Sunday an improvement even on the former ones ; and remarked that our appetites were stronger, our digestion better, our tempers less liable to irritation, and our vigour and cheerfulness greatly increased. We were therefore so satisfied with the experiment, that...
Page 65 - Tis drink and die." Tell me I hate the bowl ; " Hate " is a feeble word : I loathe abhor ; my very soul With strong disgust is stirred Whene'er I see or hear or tell Of the dark beverage of hell.
Page 13 - That total and universal abstinence from alcoholic liquors, and intoxicating beverages of all sorts, would greatly contribute to the health, the prosperity, the morality, and the happiness of the human race.
Page 13 - That a very large proportion of human misery, including poverty, disease, and crime, is induced by the use of alcoholic or fermented liquors as beverages. "2. That the most perfect health is compatible with total abstinence from all such intoxicating beverages, whether in the form of ardent spirits, or as wine, beer, ale, porter, cider, &c.
Page 143 - ... melancholy. Voltaire and Fontenelle, for the same purpose, used coffee. The excitements of Newton and Hobbes were the fumes of tobacco, while Demosthenes and Haller were sufficiently stimulated by drinking freely of cold water. Such are the differences of constitution. "As good be melancholy still, as drunken beasts and beggars.
Page 13 - That the most perfect health is compatible with total abstinence from all such intoxicating beverages, whether in the form of ardent spirits, or as wine, beer, ale, porter, cider, &c. &c. " 3. That persons accustomed to such drinks may with perfect safety discontinue them entirely, either at once, or gradually after a short time.
Page 8 - of all the evils of human life, no cause of disease has so wide a range, or so large a share, as the use of spirituous liquors ; and that more than half the sudden deaths are occasioned by them.
Page 64 - ... breakfast and dinner, and a third, shortly before going to bed. Independently of this, he indulged in wine and whatever liquor came within his reach. Even during the hours usually appropriated to sleep, the same system was pursued brandy being placed at the bed-side for his use in the night time.
Page 64 - To this destructive vice he had been addicted since his sixteenth year ; and it had gone on increasing from day to day, till it had acquired its then alarming and almost incredible magnitude.

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