The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth

Front Cover
Ibooks, 2001 - Fiction - 510 pages
13 Reviews
Roger Zelazny had a rare ability to mix the dream-like, disturbing imagery of fantasy with the real-life hardware of science fiction. His vivid imagination and fine prose made him one of the most highly acclaimed writers in his field. Twice he won the Nebula Award, and twice the Hugo Award, for excellence in novels and short fiction.
Roger Zelazny possessed a unique, dazzling talent; his visions of the future, of other worlds and of other realities are, by turns, enchanting and disturbing, and always memorable. Among the stories included in this volume are:
THE DOORS OF HIS FACE, THE LAMPS OF HIS MOUTH * A ROSE FOR ECCLESIASTES * THE MONSTER AND THE MAIDEN * THE FURIES * THE GRAVEYARD HEART * THIS MOMENT OF THE STORM

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
8
4 stars
1
3 stars
4
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth

User Review  - John Wiswell - Goodreads

My second Zelazny anthology and I'm still impressed. The style is dated, leaning very heavily on first person exposition or dialogue exposition and talking plot points to the next beat, but even that ... Read full review

Review: The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth

User Review  - Jan - Goodreads

This is the first work of Zelazny's I've read. I'm not all that impressed by the inventiveness of the plots; what stuck with me was the astonishing, highly poetic, sometimes almost biblical or prophetic language and imagery. This is a writer. Read full review

Contents

The Doors of His Face The Lamps of His Mouth
9
The Keys to December
59
Devil Car
97
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

Author Roger Zelazny was born in Euclid, Ohio on May 13, 1937. After receiving his B.A. from Case Western Reserve University and his M.A. from Columbia University, Zelazny began publishing science fiction stories in 1962. His reputation has gone through ups and downs, but he was given a Nebula award in 1966 for And Call Me Coward (1965), in a tie with Dune by Frank Herbert. He won a total of three Nebula awards and six Hugo awards. A prolific writer, Zelazny's works focus on the relationship between illusion and reality. He always pays close attention to his craft, and his stories are intelligent, occasionally sentimental, often romantic and, to his many fans, very satisfying. He died of kidney failure secondary to colorectal cancer on June 14, 1995.

Bibliographic information