Local Etymology: A Derivative Dictionary of Geographical Names (Google eBook)

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Houlston and Wright, 1859 - Names, Geographical - 325 pages
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Page 132 - ... brook. This bourn was likewise long since stopped up at the head, and in other places where the same hath broken out, but yet till this day the said street is there called High Oldborne hill, and both the sides thereof, together with all the grounds adjoining, that lie betwixt it and the river of Thames, remain full of springs, so that water is there found at hand, and hard to be stopped in every house.
Page 70 - For the better accommodation of the neighbourhood, this pump was removed to the spot where it now stands. The spring by which it is supplied is situated four feet eastward, and round it, as history informs us, the Parish Clerks of London in remote ages commonly performed sacred plays. That custom caused it to be denominated Clerks'- Well, and from which this parish derived its name.
Page 83 - The sea is called in sacred writ, the Salt Sea, the Sea of the Plain, and the East Sea. It occupies what was formerly the valley of Siddim, in which stood the five cities of the plain, Sodom, Gomorrah, Admah, Zeboim, and Bala.
Page 131 - Turnemill brook. This bourn was likewise long since stopped up at the head, and in other places where the same hath broken out, but yet till this day the said street is there called High Oldborne hill, and both the sides...
Page 104 - Then is Fewter Lane, which stretcheth south into Fleet Street, by the east end of St. Dunstan's Church, and is so called of Fewters, or idle people, lying there, as in a way leading to gardens ; but the same is now of latter years on both sides built through with many fair houses.
Page 200 - RUGGE. It is derived from paille maille, French ; at which word Cotgrave thus describes the game : — "A game, wherein a round box bowle is with a mallet struck through a high arch of iron (standing, at either end of an alley, one), which he that can do at the fewest blows, or at the number agreed on, wins.
Page 38 - Belin's-gate, or the gate of Belinus king of Britain, fellowadventurer with Brennus king of the Gauls, at * Strype't Maitland, ii.
Page 128 - In 893 the Danes, in 250 ships, commanded by the pirate Hastinges, landed at the mouth of the river Rother, near Romney Marsh, and immediately possessed themselves of Apuldore, where and at Hastings (so called from their leader) they constructed forts and ravaged all the coast to the westward of the country...
Page 86 - I'll raise from the ridge, And the two rocks together will join, To recover your loss. But the first thing that shall cross Must ever and ever be mine.
Page 172 - Sevastopol, and by his good humour, jovial habits, and entertaining qualities, became the centre of a select circle of admiring companions. Like many great conversationalists and wits, Malakoff contracted most intimate relations with Bacchus; and under the influence of the latter he participated, in 1831, in some riots which broke out in the town, and which had one result — that of the dismissal of Malakoff from the dockyard in which he was employed. Being incapable of turning himself to any more...

References from web pages

JSTOR: Wilkie Collins's "Divine Comedy": The Use of Dante in The ...
... also "Local Etymology," a review of rs Charnock, Local Etymology: a Derivative Dictionary of Geographical Names, AYR 3 (4 August 1860) 390-93. ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0029-0564(197103)25%3A4%3C383%3AWC%22CTU%3E2.0.CO%3B2-T

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