Rules and regulations of the African Institution: Formed on the 14th April, 1807, Volumes 1-3 (Google eBook)

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Printed by William Phillips, 1807 - History - 22 pages
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Page 39 - Ix'fore the determination thereof; it is hereby further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the said first day of May, one thousand seven hundred and ten, it shall and may be lawful, for any person or persons...
Page 65 - That this Meeting is deeply impressed with a sense of the enormous wrongs •which the natives of Africa have suffered in their intercourse with Europe ; and from a desire to repair those wrongs, as well as from general feelings of benevolence, is anxious to adopt such measures as are best calculated to promote their civilization and happiness.
Page 40 - It was not possible for me to behold the wonderful fertility of the soil, the vast herds of cattle proper both for labour and food, and a variety of other circumstances favourable to colonization and agriculture, and reflect, withal, on the means which presented themselves of a vast inland navigation, without lamenting that a country, so abundantly gifted and favoured by nature, should remain in its present savage and neglected state.
Page 70 - To introduce amongst the inhabitants beneficial medical discoveries. ' 7. To obtain a knowledge of the principal languages of Africa, and, as has already been found to be practicable, to reduce them to writing, with a view to facilitate the diffusion of information among the natives of that country. ' ' ' 8. To employ suitable agents, and to establish correspondences, as shall appear advisable ; and to encourage and reward individual enterprise and exertion in promoting any of the purposes of the...
Page 24 - ... one of the first lessons in which the Mandingo women instruct their children is the practice of truth. The reader will probably recollect the case of the unhappy mother, whose son was murdered by the Moorish banditti at Funingkedy. Her only consolation in her uttermost distress was the reflection that the poor boy, in the course of his blameless life, had never told a lie.
Page 40 - ... be expected from them. It cannot, however, admit of a doubt, that all the rich and valuable productions, both of the East and West Indies, might easily be naturalized and brought to the utmost perfection in the tropical parts of this immense continent.
Page 68 - That the respectful thanks of this meeting be presented to His Royal Highness the Duke of Kent, whose friendship to soldiers...
Page 40 - It cannot, however, admit of a doubt, that all the rich and valuable productions, both of the East and West Indies, might easily be naturalized, and brought to the utmost perfection, in the tropical parts of this immense continent. Nothing is wanting to this end but example, to enlighten the minds of the natives; and instruction, to enable them to direct their industry to proper objects. It was not possible for me to behold the wonderful fertility of the soil, the vast herds of cattle, proper both...
Page 21 - ... neighbourhood will have abundant employment. Hitherto they have been chiefly busied in the manufacture of Salt, which is in great demand. Their Rice Fields have certainly been prepared this year a fortnight or three weeks earlier than usual, from which I prognosticate well." • " All the wars round us are suspended for the present. I do not say that they are suspended in consequence of the Abolition; but the Abolition is very likely to prevent their revival.
Page 9 - ... impolitic. But they would observe in reply to this objection, that cotton is an article the growth of which in Africa will occasion less of competition with our own colonies than almost any other article of tropical produce which could be named ; and that it is important to be preparing sources from which a supply of cotton may be drawn, should circumstances arise to interrupt our commercial relations with America, or with the other places which now furnish it.

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