Writing a Woman's Life

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Ballantine Books, 1989 - Biography & Autobiography - 144 pages
27 Reviews
"Astute and provocative....Blends the sophistication of recent feminist theory with highly textured details fro the lives of independent and ambitious women."
THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW
Drawing on the experience of celebrated women, from George Sand and Virginia Woolf to Dorothy Sayers and Adrienne Rich, Heilbrun examines the struggle these writers undertook when their drives made it impossible for them to follow the traditional "male" script for a woman's life. Refreshing and insightful, this is an homage to brave women past and present, and an invitation to all women to write their own scripts, whatever they may be.

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Review: Writing a Woman's Life

User Review  - Olga Zilberbourg - Goodreads

A fascinating study of the tropes in writing women's biographies and women's lives. The author analyses her own decision to write a series of detective novels under a pseudonym that she kept secret for two decades. Read full review

Review: Writing a Woman's Life

User Review  - Satia - Goodreads

Good book but didn't live up to my expectations. For my full review click here. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
11
Section 2
33
Section 3
48
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (1989)

Carolyn Gold Heilbrun was born in East Orange, New Jersey on January 13, 1926. She received a bachelor's degree in English from Wellesley College in 1947 and a master's degree in 1951 and a doctorate in 1959 from Columbia University. She spent almost her entire academic career at Columbia University, joining the faculty in 1960 as an instructor of English and comparative literature and retiring as the Avalon Foundation Professor in the Humanities in 1992. She wrote several books under her real name including Toward a Recognition of Androgyny: Aspects of Male and Female in Literature, Reinventing Womanhood, Writing a Woman's Life, and The Last Gift of Time: Life Beyond Sixty. She wrote the Kate Fansler Mystery series under the pseudonym Amanda Cross. She committed suicide on October 9, 2003.

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