Final French Struggles in India and on the Indian Seas: Including an Account of the Capture of the Isles of France and ... ; with an Appendix Containing an Account of the Expedition from India to Egypt in 1801 (Google eBook)

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W.H. Allen, 1884 - Egypt - 286 pages
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Page 263 - I need not enter further upon this subject, than to entreat you will not attribute my stay to any other motive than that to which I have above assigned it ; and to inform you, that as I know what has been said and expected by the world in general, I propose, as well for my own credit as for yours, to make known to my friends and to yours, not only the distinguished manner in which you have behaved towards me, but the causes which have prevented my demonstrating my gratitude, by giving you every assistance...
Page 266 - I come now to consider the propriety and mode of crossing the Desert, supposing that the Mamelukes should be inclined to shake off the French yoke, and to co-operate with us. The first point for the General to ascertain is, their sincerity in the cause, of which, as I have above stated, there is every probability. As soon as he will have ascertained this, it will be necessary that he should make arrangements with them for posting a supply of water on that part of the Desert where it is most wanted,...
Page 203 - I established a mint, and coined my own rupees, which I made current in my army and country...
Page 262 - ... my regret at being prevented from accompanying you has been greatly increased by the kind, candid, and handsome manner in which you have behaved towards me ; and I will confess as freely, not only that I did not expect such treatment, but that my wishes before you arrived, regarding going upon the expedition, were directly the reverse of what they are at this moment. ' I need not enter further upon this subject, than to entreat you will not attribute my stay to any other motive than that to which...
Page 264 - ... cross, a very large proportion of provisions, but means must be adopted to add to them until the operations of this body shall have given them such a hold of the country as to leave no doubt of their steady supply of provisions. It is obvious that this will require a great number of cattle, a number much...
Page 174 - It must never be lost sight of that the great dream of Madhaji (sic) Sindhia's life was to unite all the native powers of India in one great confederacy against the English. In this respect he was the most far-sighted statesman that India has ever produced. ... It was a grand idea, capable of realisation by Madhaji, but by him alone, and which, but for his death, would have been realised...
Page 272 - Following the course of that river, he arrived at Rosetta August 30, 1801, where he received a letter from General Hutchinson, announcing that the French had sent a flag of truce to treat for the surrender of Alexandria. General Baird returned to India through the Red Sea, and landed at Calcutta July 31. 1802. For the particulars of this Egyptian expedition, \re refer to the Life of General Baird, attributed to Mr.
Page 252 - manner as might appear conducive to that essential " object," from the side of the Red Sea. Mr. Dundas added that, with that object in view Sir Home Popham, with a proper squadron, would be immediately sent into that sea, taking with him a regiment from the Cape of Good Hope; that his first rendezvous would be the Port of Mocha; and he directed that a force of about 1000 Europeans and 2000 Native Infantry should be sent at once from India to' the proposed place of rendezvous, with as little delay...
Page 263 - I proceed to the consideration of the third object of the expedition, viz. to assist the natives with arms and ammunition, and even to join them with a part or the whole of the army. ' The first question which I shall consider, and which will lay the grounds for a consideration of, and decision upon others, is, whether it would be practicable, or even desirable, to cross the Desert from...

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