Eros and Civilization: A Philosophical Inquiry Into Freud

Front Cover
Beacon Press, 1974 - Philosophy - 277 pages
20 Reviews

 


In this classic work, Herbert Marcuse takes as his starting point Freud's statement that civilization is based on the permanent subjugation of the human instincts, his reconstruction of the prehistory of mankind - to an interpretation of the basic trends of western civilization, stressing the philosophical and sociological implications.

 

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
6
4 stars
8
3 stars
5
2 stars
1
1 star
0

Review: Eros and Civilization: A Philosophical Inquiry into Freud

User Review  - Dana Miranda - Goodreads

Enjoyed the chapters on Phantasy and Utopia as well as The Images of Orpheus and Narcissus. Disagreed with the main sentiments and points made by Marcuse but appreciate the greater insight of how the 'life instincts' of Nietzsche have been interpreted. Read full review

Review: Eros and Civilization: A Philosophical Inquiry into Freud

User Review  - Jonathan Hockey - Goodreads

This book has some interesting second-hand insights and claims. It is a good commentary on other people's theories. But it is too timid to bring forward its own theory in an open manner. Marcuse wants ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

The Hidden Trend in Psychoanalysis
11
The Origin of the Repressed Individual Ontogenesis
21
The Origin of Repressive Civilization Phylogenesis
55
The Dialectic of Civilization
78
Philosophical Interlude
106
BEYOND THE REALITY PRINCIPLE
127
The Historical Limits of the Established Reality Principle
129
Phantasy and Utopia
140
The Images of Orpheus and Narcissus
159
The Aesthetic Dimension
172
The Transformation of Sexuality into Eros
197
Eros and Thanatos
222
Critique of NeoFreudian Revisionism
238
Index
275
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1974)

Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979) was born in Berlin and educated at the universities of Berlin and Freiburg. He fled Germany in 1933 and arrived in the United States in 1934. Marcuse taught at Columbia, Harvard, Brandeis, and the University of California, San Diego, where he met Andrew Feenberg and William Leiss as graduate students. He is the author of numerous books, including One-Dimensional Man and Eros and Civilization.

Bibliographic information