The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

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Munroe, Francis & Parker, 1811
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Page 94 - Give me another horse! bind up my wounds! Have mercy, Jesu! Soft! I did but dream. O! coward conscience, how dost thou afflict me. The lights burn blue. It is now dead midnight. Cold fearful drops stand on my trembling flesh. What! do I fear myself? there's none else by Richard loves Richard; that is, I am I.
Page 33 - Pass'd over to the end they were created, Would bring white hairs unto a quiet grave. Ah, what a life were this ! how sweet ! how lovely ! Gives not the hawthorn bush a sweeter shade To shepherds, looking on their silly sheep, Than doth a rich embroider'd canopy To kings, that fear their subjects
Page 46 - Content" to that which grieves my heart; And wet my cheeks with artificial tears, And frame my face to all occasions...
Page 25 - Seize on him, Furies ! take him to your torments !" With that, methought, a legion of foul fiends Environ'd me, and howled in mine ears Such hideous cries, that, with the very noise, I trembling wak'd, and, for a season after, Could not believe but that I was in hell, Such terrible impression made my dream.
Page 3 - Grim-visag'd war hath smooth'd his wrinkled front; And now, instead of mounting barbed steeds To fright the souls of fearful adversaries, He capers nimbly in a lady's chamber To the lascivious pleasing of a lute.
Page 32 - When this is known, then to divide the times: So many hours must I tend my flock; So many hours must I take my rest; So many hours must I contemplate; So many hours must I sport myself; So many days my ewes have been with young; So many weeks ere the poor fools will yean; So many years ere I shall shear the fleece: So minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, and years, Pass'd over to the end they were created, Would bring white hairs unto a quiet grave.
Page 36 - Will I upon thy party wear this rose. And here I prophesy, this brawl to-day , Grown to this faction in the Temple garden, Shall send , between the red rose and the white , A thousand souls to death and deadly night.
Page 63 - Be brave then ; for your captain is brave, and vows reformation. There shall be, in England, seven half-penny loaves sold for a penny : the three-hooped pot shall have ten hoops ; and I will make it felony, to drink small beer : all the realm shall be in common, and in Cht-apside shall my palfry go to grass.
Page 94 - My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, And every tongue brings in a several tale, And every tale condemns me for a villain.

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