Edward the Second

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Manchester University Press, Oct 15, 1995 - Drama - 384 pages
3 Reviews
The introduction to this edition contains an analysis of the first quarto (including new evidence of its original dating) and a reconsideration of the play's complex relation to the Shakespearean histories that preceded and followed it. Charles R. Forker offers a discussion of Marlowe's use of sources, and presents a new argument for the drama's five-act structure. He delves into the conflicting and controversial opinions concerning the genre and sexual politics of the play, and also includes a full record of the stage history. Forker has collated some 46 editions (including the important, rare and usually ignored editions of Broughton and Oxberry in 1818). The appendices provide substantive variants from the Broughton and Oxberry texts as well as extracts from the sources.
  

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User Review  - TiffanyAK - LibraryThing

I chose to read an online edition of this play for my Play Analysis paper for my Intro. to Drama class. Therefore, I am not talking about this exact edition, but am talking about the main work itself ... Read full review

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User Review  - sageness - LibraryThing

I am very fond of this play and the broad range of interpretations available based on how the actors interpret the roles. It's an incredibly versatile text, and the language of some portions is really beautiful. Read full review

Contents

The text
1
EDWARD II
137
APPENDICES
321
B Longer Extracts from Marlowes Sources
327
GLOSSARIAL INDEX TO THE COMMENTARY
364
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Christopher Marlowe was born in Canterbury, England on February 6, 1564. He received a B.A. in 1584 and an M.A. in 1587 from Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. His original plans for a religious career were put aside when he decided to become a poet and playwright. His earliest work was translating Lucan and Ovid from Latin into English. He translated Vergil's Aeneid as a play. His plays included Tamburlaine the Great, Faustus, The Jew of Malta, and Dido, Queen of Carthage. His unfinished poem Hero and Leander was published in 1598. In 1589, he and a friend killed a man, but were acquitted on a plea of self-defense. His political views were unorthodox, and he was thought to be a government secret agent. He was arrested in May 1593 on a charge of atheism. He was killed in a brawl in a Deptford tavern on May 30, 1593.

Charles R. Forker, Indiana University

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