Hideous Absinthe: A History of the Devil in a Bottle

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I.B.Tauris, 2004 - Absinthe - 294 pages
12 Reviews
Mysteriously sophisticated, darkly alluring, almost Satanic: absinthe was the drink of choice of Baudelaire, Verlaine and Wilde. It inspired paintings by Degas and Manet, van Gogh and Picasso. It was blamed for conditions ranging from sterility to madness, to French defeats in World War I. The campaign against the devil in a bottle resulted in its ban throughout most of Europe. Its reputation for toxicity eventually extinguished the fin de siecle's infatuation with absinthe, but not before it had influenced many generations of artists on both sides of the channel. This text is a biography of the green fairy; from its place in the lives of writers and artists who were inspired - and ruined - by it, to its more recent rediscovery by Ernest Hemingway and today's would-be sophisticates.
  

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Review: Hideous Absinthe: A History of the Devil in a Bottle

User Review  - Goodreads

I became interested in Absinthe after reading of how it is often blamed for the madness of notable characters such as Van Gogh and also blamed for, or at least being a major contributing factor in the ... Read full review

Review: Hideous Absinthe: A History of the Devil in a Bottle

User Review  - Philip Walker - Goodreads

I became interested in Absinthe after reading of how it is often blamed for the madness of notable characters such as Van Gogh and also blamed for, or at least being a major contributing factor in the ... Read full review

Contents

The Devil Made Liquid
1
Bitter Beginnings
15
The Green Hour and the New Art
24
Absinthe for the People
46
Poets Breaking the Rules
65
Madmen of Art
87
The Absinthe Binge
123
English Decadence and French Morals
138
Absinthe Paranoia
177
Twilight of the Fee Verte
196
Green in the USA
216
Pop Goes the Fairy
236
Lendemain
251
Notes on the Text
253
Select Bibliography
275
Index
283

AngloSaxon Attitudes
159

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