Hardy: Selected Poems (Google eBook)

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Penguin, Dec 1, 1998 - Poetry - 320 pages
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Hardy abandoned the novel at the turn of the century, probably after public reaction to Jude the Obscure, but continued to write verse displaying a wide variety of metrical styles and stanza forms and a broad scope of tone and attitude. This definitive volume contains selections from his numerous collections published between 1898 and 1928.

  

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Contents

At the Word Farewell
108
Heredity
109
To the Moon
111
Timing Her
112
The Blinded Bird
114
The Wind Blew Words
115
To My Fathers Violin
116
The Pedigree
117

The Souls of the Slain
16
At the Pyramid of Cestius near the Graves of Shelley and Keats
21
To the Matterhorn
22
To Lizbie Browne
24
I Need Not Go
27
At A Hasty Wedding
28
Wives in the Sere
29
An August Midnight
30
Winter in Durnover Field
31
The Last Chrysanthemum
32
The Darkling Thrush
33
Mad Joy
34
The Ruined Maid
35
The Respectable Burgher on The Higher Criticism
36
The SelfUnseeing
37
In Tenebris I
38
From TIMES LAUGHINGSTOCKS AND OTHER VERSES
39
A Trampwomans Tragedy
41
The House of Hospitalities
45
The Rejected Members Wife
46
Shut Out That Moon
47
The Division
48
In the Night She Came
49
The Night of the Dance
50
At Casterbridge Fair
51
After the ClubDance
52
The Inquiry
53
A Wife Waits
54
To Carrey Clavel
55
The Orphaned Old Maid
56
The Homecoming
57
A Church Romance
59
After the Last Breath
60
One We Knew
61
She Hears the Storm
62
The Man He Killed
63
One Ralph Blossom Solioquizes
64
From SATIRES OF CIRCUMSTANCE LYRICS AND REVERIES
67
Channel Firing
69
The Convergence of the Twain
70
My Spirit Will Not Haunt the Mound
72
Wessex Heights
73
The Schreckhorn
75
Before and After Summer
77
At DayClose in November
78
Poems of 191213
79
Your Last Drive
80
The Walk
81
Rain on a Grave
82
Without Ceremony
83
Lament
84
The Haunter
85
The Voice
86
His Visitor
87
After a Journey
88
At Castle Boterel
89
She Charged Me
91
In the Days of Crinoline
92
The Workbox
93
Exeunt Omnes
95
Satires of Circumstance in Fifteen Glimpses
96
By Her Aunts Grave
97
At A WateringPlace
98
Outside the Window
99
At the AlterRail
100
In the Nuptial Chamber
101
At the Drapers
102
Over the Coffin
103
In the Moonlight
104
From MOMENTS OF VISION AND MISCELLANEOUS VERSES
105
We Sat at the Window
107
Where They Lived
119
Something Tapped
120
The Photograph
121
An Anniversary
122
Transformations
123
Great Things
124
At MiddleField Gate in February
125
On Sturminster FootBridge
126
A Thought in Two Moods
128
The Caged Goldfinch
129
The Five Students
130
During Wind and Rain
131
He Prefers Her Earthy
132
A Backward Spring
133
At a Country Fair
134
Jubilate
135
Midnight on the Great Western
136
The Shadow on the Stone
137
In the Garden
138
The Choirmasters Burial
139
In Time of The Breaking of Nations
141
Afterwards
142
From LATE LYRICS AND EARLIER
143
Weathers
145
According to the Mighty Working
146
Going and Staying
147
The Contretemps
148
A Night in November
150
On the Tune Called the OldHundredandFourth
151
Voices from Things Growing in a Churchyard
152
A TwoYears Idyll
154
Fetching Her
155
A Procession of Dead Days
156
In the Small Hours
157
The Dream Is Which?
158
Lonely Days
159
The Marble Tablet
160
The Master and the Leaves
161
Last Words to a Dumb Friend
162
An Ancient to Ancients
164
From HUMAN SHOWS FAR PHANTASIES SONGS AND TRIFLES
167
Waiting Both
169
Evening
170
Ten Years Since
171
Life and Death at Sunrise
172
A Sheep Fair
173
The Calf
174
Snow in the Suburbs
175
Ice on the Highway
176
One Who Married Above Him
177
Last LoveWord
179
Nobody Comes
180
The Harbour Bridge
181
The Missed Train
182
Rettys Phases
183
The Sundial on a Wet Dry
184
Shortening Days at the Homestead
185
A Hurried Meeting
186
A Leaving
188
From WINTER WORDS IN VARIOUS MOODS AND METRES
189
Proud Songsters
191
Expectation and Experience
192
Throwing a Tree
193
Lying Awake
194
A Gentlemans SecondHand Suit
195
A Forgotten Miniature
196
Hardys Notes and Remarks
197
Notes
205
Index of Titles and First Lines
245
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About the author (1998)

Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840. In his writing, he immortalized the site of his birth—Egdon Heath, in Dorset, near Dorchester. Delicate as a child, he was taught at home by his mother before he attended grammar school. At sixteen, Hardy was apprenticed to an architect, and for many years, architecture was his profession; in his spare time, he pursued his first and last literary love, poetry. Finally convinced that he could earn his living as an author, he retired from architecture, married, and devoted himself to writing. An extremely productive novelist, Hardy published an important book every year or two. In 1896, disturbed by the public outcry over the unconventional subjects of his two greatest novels—Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Jude the Obscure—he announced that he was giving up fiction and afterward produced only poetry. In later years, he received many honors. He died on January 11, 1928, and was buried in Poet’s Corner, in Westminster Abbey. It was as a poet that he wished to be remembered, but today critics regard his novels as his most memorable contribution to English literature for their psychological insight, decisive delineation of character, and profound presentation of tragedy.

Thomas Hardy was born on June 2, 1840. In his writing, he immortalized the site of his birth—Egdon Heath, in Dorset, near Dorchester. Delicate as a child, he was taught at home by his mother before he attended grammar school. At sixteen, Hardy was apprenticed to an architect, and for many years, architecture was his profession; in his spare time, he pursued his first and last literary love, poetry. Finally convinced that he could earn his living as an author, he retired from architecture, married, and devoted himself to writing. An extremely productive novelist, Hardy published an important book every year or two. In 1896, disturbed by the public outcry over the unconventional subjects of his two greatest novels—Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Jude the Obscure—he announced that he was giving up fiction and afterward produced only poetry. In later years, he received many honors. He died on January 11, 1928, and was buried in Poet’s Corner, in Westminster Abbey. It was as a poet that he wished to be remembered, but today critics regard his novels as his most memorable contribution to English literature for their psychological insight, decisive delineation of character, and profound presentation of tragedy.

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