English Puritanism, 1603-1689

Front Cover
Palgrave Macmillan, Oct 15, 1998 - History - 257 pages
0 Reviews
The Puritans of seventeenth-century England have been blamed for everything from the English civil war to the rise of capitalism. But who were the Puritans of Stuart England? How did their neighbors identify them, and how did they recognize one another? Were they apostles of liberty who fled from persecution to the New World? Or were they intolerant fanatics, intent on bringing godliness to Stuart England? This study provides a clear narrative of the rise and fall of the Puritans across the troubled seventeenth century. Their story is placed in context by analytical chapters which describe what the Puritans believed and how they organized their religious and social life. Quoting many contemporary sources, including diaries, plays, and sermons, this is a vivid and comprehensible account, drawing on the most recent scholarship.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

John Spurr is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Wales, Swansea.

Bibliographic information