The Location of Culture

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1994 - Art - 408 pages
36 Reviews
Terry Eagleton once wrote in the Guardian, 'Few post-colonial writers can rival Homi Bhabha in his exhilarated sense of alternative possibilities'. In rethinking questions of identity, social agency and national affiliation, Bhabha provides a working, if controversial, theory of cultural hybridity, one that goes far beyond previous attempts by others. A scholar who writes and teaches about South Asian literature and contemporary art with incredible virtuosity, he discusses writers as diverse as Morrison, Gordimer, and Conrad. In The Location of Culture, Bhabha uses concepts such as mimicry, interstice, hybridity, and liminality to argue that cultural production is always most productive where it is most ambivalent. Speaking in a voice that combines intellectual ease with the belief that theory itself can contribute to practical political change, Bhabha has become one of the leading post-colonial theorists of this era.
  

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Review: The Location of Culture (Routledge Classics)

User Review  - Matías Zitterkopf - Goodreads

If you want to torture someone or yourself, go ahead and read this book. I've read some chapters for my thesis, I found some definitions I needed but it's a very complex kind of reading. Homi takes a ... Read full review

Review: The Location of Culture (Routledge Classics)

User Review  - Salvatore - Goodreads

Although this could have been perhaps a third of the size due to unnecessary repetition and emphasis on the major points, as well as some rambling side issues, this is an engaging and critical read on ... Read full review

Contents

Locations of culture
1
The commitment to theory
28
Interrogating identity Frantz Fanon and the postcolonial prerogative
57
The other question Stereotype discrimination and the discourse of colonialism
94
Of mimicry and man The ambivalence of colonial discourse
121
Sly civility
132
Signs taken for wonders Questions of ambivalence and authority under a tree outside Delhi May 1817
145
Articulating the archaic Cultural difference and colonial nonsense
175
DissemiNation Time narrative and the margins of the modern nation
199
The postcolonial and the postmodern The question of agency
245
By bread alone Signs of violence in the midnineteenth century
283
How newness enters the world Postmodern space postcolonial times and the trials of cultural translation
303
Conclusion Race time and the revision of modernity
338
NOTES
368
INDEX
397
Copyright

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About the author (1994)

Homi K Bhabha (1949- ) Born into the Parsi community of Bombay, Bhabha is a leading voice in postcolonial studies. He is currently Professor of English and Afro-American Studies, Harvard University

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