Report of a Committee Appointed to Inquire Into the Actual Condition of the Slaves in this Island. ... (Google eBook)

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W. Sior, 1824 - Slavery - 127 pages
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Page 71 - If a new road, for instance, were to be made through the grounds of a private person, it might, perhaps, be extensively beneficial to the public, but the law permits no man, or set of men, to do this without the consent of the owner of the land.
Page 70 - THE third absolute right, inherent in every Englishman, is that of property : which consists in the free use, enjoyment, and disposal of all his acquisitions, without any control or diminution, save only by the laws of the land.
Page 71 - In vain may it be urged that the good of the individual ought to yield to that of the community, for it would be dangerous to allow any private man, or even any public tribunal, to be the judge of this common good, and to decide whether it be expedient or no. Besides, the public good is in nothing more essentially interested than in the protection of every individual's private rights as modelled by the Municipal Law.
Page 11 - Both thy bondmen and thy bondmaids, which thou shalt have, shall be of the heathen that are round about you ; of them shall ye buy bondmen and bondmaids. Moreover of the children of the strangers that do sojourn among you, of them shall ye buy, and of their families that are with you, which they begat in your land: and they shall be your possession. And ye shall take them as an inheritance for your children after you to inherit them for a possession ; they shall be your bondmen for ever : but over...
Page 71 - Not by absolutely stripping the subject of his property in an arbitrary manner, but by giving him a full indemnification and equivalent for the injury thereby sustained. The public is now considered as an individual, treating with an individual for an exchange. All that the legislature does, is to oblige the owner to alienate his possessions for a reasonable price ; and even this is an exertion of power, which the legislature indulges with caution, and which nothing but the legislature can perform.
Page 70 - ... commentaries ; but certainly the modifications under which we at present find it, the method of conserving it in the present owner, and of translating it from man to man, are entirely derived from society ; and are some of those civil advantages, in exchange for which every individual has resigned a part of his natural liberty.
Page 32 - For several years before he disclosed his intentions to any one, he appears to have been constantly and assiduously engaged in endeavoring to imbitter the minds of the colored population against the white. He rendered himself perfectly familiar with all those parts of the Scriptures which he thought he could pervert to his purpose, and would readily quote them to prove that slavery was contrary to the laws of God...
Page 70 - The original of private property is probably founded in nature, as will be more fully explained in the second book of the ensuing commentaries : but certainly the modifications under which we at present find it, the method of conserving it in the present owner, and of translating it from man to man, are entirely derived from society ; and are some of those civil advantages, in exchange for which every individual has resigned a part of his natural liberty.
Page 71 - ... consent of the owner of the land. In vain it may be urged that the good of the individual ought to yield to that of the community; for it would be dangerous to allow any private man, or even any public tribunal, to be the judge of this common good, and to decide whether it be expedient or no.
Page 35 - God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, And in the year of Our Lord one thousand Eight hundred and thirteen. " GEO. ScnoLEV, Mayor.

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