The World's Work, Volume 19 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Walter Hines Page, Arthur W. Page
Doubleday, Page & Company, 1910 - History, Modern
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Page 12472 - Build thee more stately mansions, O my soul, As the swift seasons roll! Leave thy low-vaulted past! Let each new temple, nobler than the last, Shut thee from heaven with a dome more vast, Till thou at length art free, Leaving thine outgrown shell by life's unresting sea!
Page 12226 - Land without population is a wilderness and population without land is a mob. The United States has many social, political, and economic questions some old, some new to settle in the near future; but none so fundamental as the true relation of the land to the national life. The first act in the progress of any civilization is to provide homes for those who desire to sit under their own vine and fig tree.
Page 12197 - ... next preceding, and whether he has previously voted, and, if so, the state, county, and precinct in which he voted last; and, Third.
Page 12252 - Ages will not produce a systematic change without public attention and encouragement ; but a few years more of increased sterility will drive the inhabitants of the Atlantic States westwardly for support ; whereas, if they were taught how to improve the old, instead of going in pursuit of new and productive soils, they would make those acres which now scarcely yield them any thing, turn out beneficial to themselves...
Page 12275 - The government of a people by itself has a meaning and a reality ; but such a thing as government of one people by another does not and cannot exist.
Page 12226 - ... political, and economic questions, some old, some new, to settle in the near future; but none so fundamental as the true relation of the land to the national life. The first act in the progress of any civilization is to provide homes for those who desire to sit under their own vine and fig-tree. A prosperous agricultural interest is to a nation what good digestion is to a man.
Page 12695 - What the poor man needs is a prompt decision of his case, and by limiting the appeals in cases involving small amounts of money so that there shall be a final decision in the lower court, an opportunity is given to the poor litigant to secure a judgment in time to enjoy it and not after he has exhausted all his resources in litigating to the supreme court.
Page 12695 - It is not too much to say that the administration of criminal law in this country is a disgrace to our civilization and that the prevalence of crime and fraud, which here is greatly in excess of that in European countries, is due largely to the failure of the law and its administration to bring criminals to justice.
Page 12673 - Good . . . is unfortunately one of the cui bono people, and is too much in the habit of looking at the dark side of things. Such a chimerical idea as telegraphing vocal sounds would indeed, to most minds, seem scarcely feasible enough to spend time in working over. I believe, however, that...
Page 12771 - Sheep, one year old or over, $1.50 per head; less than one year old, 75 cents per head. All other live animals not specially provided for in this section, 20 per centum ad valorem.

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