Fungi in Ecosystem Processes (Google eBook)

Front Cover
John Dighton
CRC Press, May 14, 2003 - Science - 424 pages
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Adopting the novel approach of viewing the role of fungi from the perspective of ecosystem functions, this book examines the importance of fungi in soil formation, plant primary production, sustenance of secondary producers, and regulation of plant and animal populations and communities. This volume emphasizes the idea that fungi are not alone in the regulation of these processes. It addresses the main processes occurring in ecosystems and showing where and how fungi are critical, and enables readers to gain a better understanding of the role of fungi in shaping ecosystems. "Fungi in Ecosystem Processes" considers the negative impact of fungi on faunal productivity and includes more than 1200 citations.

  

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Contents

Introduction
1
12 WHAT ARE ECOSYSTEMS AND ECOSYSTEM FUNCTIONS?
3
13 WHAT ARE FUNGI?
8
14 SPECIFIC ECOSYSTEM SERVICES CARRIED OUT BY FUNGI
15
15 CONCLUDING REMARKS
18
REFERENCES
20
Fungi and Primary Productivity Making Nutrients Available
27
22 NUTRIENT AVAILABILITY IN AQUATIC AND MARINE ECOSYSTEMS
69
Fungi and Population and Community Regulation
243
51 MYCORRHIZAE AND PLANT SUCCESSIONS
244
52 MYCORRHIZAE AND PLANT FITNESS
250
53 PLANT PATHOGENS AND PLANT FITNESS
259
BIOCONTROL
265
55 MYCORRHIZALPATHOGEN INTERACTIONS
268
56 ENDOPHYTES AND ANTIHERBIVORE ACTION
274
57 NEMATOPHAGOUS FUNGI AND ANIMAL PATHOGENS
281

23 CONCLUDING REMARKS
81
REFERENCES
83
Fungi and Primary Productivity Plant Growth and Carbon Fixation
93
31 THE ROLE OF LICHENS IN PRIMARY PRODUCTION
94
32 THE ROLE OF MYCORRHIZAE IN PLANT PRIMARY PRODUCTION
99
33 THE ROLE OF FUNGAL PATHOGENS IN PLANT PRIMARY PRODUCTION
154
34 INTERACTIONS AMONG MYCORRHIZAE AND PLANT PATHOGENS
157
35 SYNOPSIS AND OUTLOOK
162
REFERENCES
163
Fungi Secondary Productivity and Other Fungal Faunal Interactions
185
POSITIVE IMPACTS ON FAUNAL PRODUCTIVITY
186
NEGATIVE AND POSITIVE FEEDBACKS
197
43 SPECIFIC FUNGALFAUNAL INTERACTIONS
217
NEGATIVE IMPACTS ON FAUNAL PRODUCTIVITY
221
45 FUNGALFAUNAL INTERACTIONS IN AQUATIC AND MARINE ECOSYSTEMS
226
46 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
229
REFERENCES
232
58 ALLELOPATHY
285
59 SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION
288
REFERENCES
293
Fungal Interactions with Humans
305
63 FUNGI AND HEAVY METALS
323
64 FUNGI AND RADIONUCLIDES
341
65 FUNGI AND CLIMATE CHANGE
355
66 CONCLUDING REMARKS
370
Synopsis and Outlook to the Future
391
72 THE ECOSYSTEM
392
73 THE FUNGAL ORGANISM
397
74 THE FUNGAL COMMUNITY
403
75 PERTURBATIONS
405
WHAT NEXT?
406
REFERENCES
409
Index
417
Copyright

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Page 410 - Brasier, CM (2001). Rapid evolution of introduced plant pathogens via interspecific hybridization. BioScience 51:123-133.

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About the author (2003)

John Dighton is Director of the Rutgers University Pinelands Field Station, New Lisbon, New Jersey, and Professor of Biology at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Science, New Bruinswick, and in the Department of biology at the Camden Campus, Rutgers University, New Jersey. The author or coathor of more than 100 professional publications, he is a member of the British Mycological Society, the British Ecological Society, and the Mycological Society of America, among others. Dr. Dighton received the B.Sc. degree (1971) from the University of London, England; the M.Sc. degree (1973) from the University of Durham, England, and the Ph.D. degree (1976) from the University of London, Queen Elizabeth College, England.

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