Jane Morris: the Pre-Raphaelite model of beauty

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Pomegranate, Sep 19, 2000 - Art - 113 pages
4 Reviews
Immortalized by painter Dante Gabriel Rossetti and widely imitated by fashionable women, Jane Morris (1839-1914) was not a typical Victorian beauty. Her unruly dark hair, lanky figure, and loose garments stood out in an age that favored petite, fair-haired women with feminine curves. Drawing on lavish portraits and rare photographs, Debra Mancoff examines Morris's image within the context of Pre-Raphaelite aesthetic ideals and Victorian standards of fashion. Part biography, part art history, and part cultural study, Jane Morris traces the beauty's rise from an eighteen-year-old working-class Oxford girl to a virtual "supermodel" for the Pre-Raphaelites, focusing on her relationships with artist-designer William Morris, whom she married in 1859, and Rossetti, with whom she shared a life-long romance.

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User Review  - Big_Bang_Gorilla - LibraryThing

Being a necessarily scattershot examination of the life and influence of Jane Morris, muse to the pre-Raphaelites. It's an interesting idea for a book within its considerable limitations. The illustrations are thoughtfully chosen and well-presented. Read full review

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User Review  - Whisper1 - LibraryThing

She was the daughter of an Oxford stable hand. Born of low class, her life radically changed when she attended a play with her sister and by chance met the two Pre-Raphaelite artists, Gabriel Dante ... Read full review

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About the author (2000)

Debra N. Mancoff is the author of "David Roberts: Travels in Egypt & the Holy Land" (Pomegranate, 1999); "Burne-Jones" (Pomegranate, 1998); "The Return of King Arthur: The Legend Through Victorian Eyes" (Harry N. Abrams, 1995) & many other publications. She attended the University of Illinois & Northwestern University (where she received her Ph.D.). She currently is a scholar-in-residence at the Newberry Library in Chicago.

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