Garibaldi and the Making of Italy (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1911 - Italy - 390 pages
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Page 139 - To quell the mighty of the earth, the oppressor, The brute and boisterous force of violent men, Hardy and industrious to support Tyrannic power, but raging to pursue The righteous, and all such as honour truth ; He all their ammunition And feats of war defeats, With plain heroic magnitude of mind And celestial vigour arm'd...
Page 69 - Whose powers shed round him in the common strife, Or mild concerns of ordinary life, A constant influence, a peculiar grace; But who, if he be called upon to face Some awful moment to which Heaven has joined Great issues, good or bad for human kind, Is happy as a Lover; and attired With sudden brightness, like a Man inspired...
Page 69 - Whose high endeavours are an inward light That makes the path before him always bright: Who, with a natural instinct to discern What knowledge can perform, is diligent to learn ; Abides by this resolve, and stops not there, But makes his moral being his prime care ; Who, doomed to go in company with Pain, And Fear, and Bloodshed, miserable train!
Page 392 - By RICHARD LODGE, MA, LL.D., Professor of History in the University of Edinburgh ; formerly Fellow of Brasenose College, Oxford. With a Maps. VOL. IX. FROM THE ACCESSION OF ANNE TO THE DEATH OF GEORGE II.
Page 391 - THE ROMAN EMPIRE : Essays on the Constitutional History from the Accession of Domitian (81 AD) to the Retirement of Nicephorus III. (1081 AD) By the Rev.
Page 282 - Her Majesty's Government can see no sufficient ground for the severe censure with which Austria, France, Prussia, and Russia have visited the acts of the King of Sardinia. Her Majesty's Government will turn their eyes rather to the gratifying prospect of a people building up the edifice of their liberties, and consolidating the work of their independence, amid the sympathies and good wishes of Europe.
Page 290 - What a noble human being ! I expected to see a hero and I was not disappointed. One cannot exactly say of him what Chaucer says of the ideal knight, "As meke he was of port as is a maid"; he is more majestic than meek, and his manners have a certain divine simplicity in them, such as I have never witnessed in a native of these islands, among men at least, and they are gentler than those of most young maidens whom I know. He came here and smoked his cigar in my little room and we had a half hour's...
Page 392 - Chichele Professor of Modern History in the University of Oxford ; Fellow of the British Academy. With 3 Maps. Vol. V. FROM THE ACCESSION OF HENRY VII TO THE DEATH OF HENRY VIII (1485 to 1547).
Page 139 - When God into the hands of their deliverer Puts invincible might To quell the mighty of the earth, the oppressor, The brute and boisterous force of violent men...
Page 217 - Ho! maidens of Vienna; Ho! matrons of Lucerne; Weep, weep, and rend your hair for those who never shall return. Ho ! Philip, send, for charity, thy Mexican pistoles, That Antwerp monks may sing a mass for thy poor spearmen's souls.

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