Soldier and Society in Roman Egypt: A Social History

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Psychology Press, 1995 - History - 263 pages
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The province of Egypt provides unique archaeological and documentary evidence for the study of the Roman army. In this fascinating social history Richard Alston examines the economic, cultural, social and legal aspects of a military career, illuminating the life and role of the individual soldier in the army.
Soldier and Society in Roman Eygpt provides a complete reassessment of the impact of the Roman army on local societies, and convincingly challenges the orthodox picture. The soldiers are seen not as an isolated elite living in fear of the local populations, but as relatively well-integrated into local communities. The unsuspected scale of the army's involvement in these communities offers a new insight into both Roman rule in Egypt and Roman imperialism more generally.
  

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
THE ARMY AND THE PROVINCE
13
RECRUITMENT AND VETERAN SETTLEMENT
39
THE LEGAL STATUS OF SOLDIERS AND VETERANS
53
THE ARMY IN ACTION
69
THE ARMY AND THE ECONOMY
102
KARANIS A VILLAGE IN EGYPT
117
DIOCLETIAN AND AFTER
143
CONCLUSION
156
MILITARY UNITS
163
THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE ARMY
192
Notes
208
Bibliography
241
Index
259
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About the author (1995)

Alston teaches classics at Royal Holloway, University of London.

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