We: New Edition

Front Cover
Penguin, 1993 - Fiction - 221 pages
6 Reviews

A superb new translation of the classic dystopian novel Set in the twenty-sixth century AD, Zamyatin's masterpiece describes life under the regimented totalitarian society of OneState, ruled over by the all-powerful 'Benefactor'. Recognized as the inspiration for George Orwell's 1984, We is the archetype of the modern dystopia, or anti-Utopia: a great prose poem detailing the fate that might befall us all if we surrender our individual selves to some collective dream of technology and fail in the vigilance that is the price of freedom. Clarence Brown's brilliant translation is based on the corrected text of the novel, first published in Russia in 1988 after more than sixty years' suppression.

  

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Record 30

Contents

IV
3
V
5
VI
11
VII
16
IX
21
X
25
XI
33
XII
39
XXVI
121
XXVII
125
XXVIII
130
XXIX
135
XXX
143
XXXI
147
XXXII
154
XXXIII
163

XIII
45
XIV
50
XV
59
XVI
64
XVII
69
XVIII
75
XIX
78
XX
83
XXI
90
XXII
97
XXIII
104
XXIV
110
XXV
114
XXXIV
167
XXXV
171
XXXVI
180
XXXVII
187
XXXVIII
189
XXXIX
198
XL
205
XLI
210
XLII
215
XLIII
218
XLIV
224
XLV
226
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

Yevgeny Ivanovich Zamyatin (1884-1937) was a naval architect by profession and a writer by nature. His favorite idea was the absolute freedom of the human personality to create, to imagine, to love, to make mistakes, and to change the world. This made him a highly inconvenient citizen of two despotisms, the tsarist and the Communist, both of which exiled him, the first for a year, the latter forever. He wrote short stories, plays, and essays, but his masterpiece is We, written in 1920-21 and soon thereafter translated into most of the languages of the world. It first appeared in Russia only in 1988. It is the archetype of the modern dystopia, or anti-utopia; a great prose poem on the fate that might befall all of us if we surrender our individual selves to some collective dream of technology and fail in the vigilance that is the price of freedom. George Orwell, the author of 1984, acknowledged his debt to Zamyatin. The other great English dystopia of our time, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, was evidently written out of the same impulse, though without direct knowledge of Zamyatin's We.
Clarence Brown is the author of several works on the Russian poet Osip Mandelstam. He is editor of The Portable Twentieth-Century Russian Reader, which contains his translation of Zamyatin's short story "The Cave," and of Yury Olesha's novel Enpy.
Clarence Brown is the author of several works on the Russian poet Osip Mandelstam. He is editor of The Portable Twentieth-Century Russian Reader, which contains his translation of Zamyatin's short story "The Cave," and of Yury Olesha's novel Enpy.

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