Berliner gramophone records: American issues, 1892-1900

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Greenwood Press, May 30, 1995 - Music - 290 pages
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Just over 100 years ago, Emile Berliner invented the gramophone and disc record. This is the first discography assembled of the first disc recordings in the United States. It documents over 3,000 discs, which were sold to the American public from 1892 to 1900. Listings are arranged by catalogue number and cross-indexed by title, performer, and recording date. The gramophone discs are valuable research tools in the study of popular culture, providing objective data about what was offered to the public, and how it was performed. Since this information has never been published, scholars may well find new materials. Berliner's successor was the Victor Talking Machine Company (an ongoing Greenwood discography series). An introductory essay discusses the earliest years of the invention and the repertoire appearing on the discs. Their physical properties are noted and illustrated with photographs of the records. A descriptive bibliography guides readers to other books and articles of interest. Another section lists Berliner Gramophone records that have been reissued on long-playing and compact discs. This volume will be of interest to gramophone record collectors, record archives, and music libraries, as well as to scholars, music students, and buffs.

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Contents

Listing of Block Series Numbers 1 8021
1
Listing of 0 Series Numbers 01 01304
105
American Berliner Gramophone Records on LP and CD
171
Copyright

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