The Chapman Family: Or The Descendants of Robert Chapman, One of the First Settlers of Say-brook, Conn., with Genealogical Notes of William Chapman, who Settled in New London, Conn.; Edward Chapman, who Settled at Windsor, Conn.; John Chapman, of Stonington, Conn.; and Rev. Benjamin Chapman, of Southington, Conn (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Case, Tiffany and Company, 1854 - College presidents - 414 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Related books

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 355 - Christian like and decent manner at the discretion of my Executors, nothing doubting but at the General resurrection I shall receive the same again by the Mighty Power of God, and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me with in this Life I give devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form.
Page 355 - God: therefore calling to Mind the Mortality of my Body, and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament...
Page 374 - I give and recommend my Soul to God who gave it, and my body to the Earth from whence it came to be buried in a decent Christian burial at the discretion of my friends.
Page 337 - ... for the boards ; and in a dry time and a dark night they came as they did before, and found the way a little too sharp for them ; and as they skipped from one they trod upon another, and left the nails and doors dyed with their blood, which you know we saw the next morning, laughing at it. And this I write that young men may learn, if they should meet with such trials as we met with there, and have not opportunity to cut off their enemies ; yet they may, with such pretty pranks, preserve...
Page 326 - ... need were, to defend them from the Pequits, for I durst not trust them. So they went and found but little trade, and they having forgotten what I charged them, Thomas Hurlbut and one more went ashore to boil the kettle, and Thomas Hurlbut stepping into the Sachem's wigwam, not far from the shore, enquiring for the horses, the Indians went out of the wigwam,, and Wincumbone, his mother's sister, was then the great Pequit Sachem's wife, who made signs to him that he should be gone, for they would...
Page 323 - Desires and having rumaged and found some old papers then written it was a great help to my memory. You know that when I came to you I was an engineer or architect, whereof carpentry is a little part, but you know I could never use all the tools, for although for my necessity, I was forced sometimes to use my shifting chissel and my holdfast, yet you know I could never endure nor abide the smoothing plane ; I have sent you a piece of timber scored and forehewed unfit to join to any handsome piece...
Page 375 - Gaylord as and for his last will and testament in presence of us who in his presence and in the presence of each other and at his request have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto.
Page 337 - You Robert Chapman, you know that when you and John Bagley were beating samp at the Garden Pales, the sentinels called you to run in, for there was a number of Pequits creeping to you to catch you ; I hearing it went up to the Redoubt and put two cross-bar shot into the two guns that lay above, and levelled them at the trees in the middle of the limbs and boughs, and gave order to John Frend and his man to stand with hand-spikes to turn them this or that way, as they should hear the Indians shout,...
Page 328 - Spencer in the back, into his kidneys, myself into the thigh, two more were shot dead. But in our retreat I kept Hurlbut and Spencer still before us, we defending ourselves with our naked swords, or else they had taken us all alive, so that the two sore wounded men, by our slow retreat, got home with their guns, when our two sound men ran away and left their guns behind them. But when I saw the cowards that left us, I resolved to let them draw lots which of them should be hanged, for the articles...
Page 329 - ... killed all us. Having heard this, they were mad as dogs, and ran away ; then when they came to the place from whence they came, I waved my hat about my head, and the two great guns went off, so that there was a great hubbub amongst them. Then two days after, came down Capt. Mason, and Sergeant Seely, with five men more, to see how it was with us ; and whilst they were there, came down a Dutch boat, telling us the Indians had killed fourteen English, for by that boat I had sent up letters to Conectecott,...

References from web pages

The Chapman Family of New London, Connecticut
The Chapman Family: or the Descendants of Robert Chapman, One of the First Settlers of Say-Brook, Conn. with Genealogical Notes of William Chapman, ...
www.geocities.com/ Heartland/ River/ 7560/ chapman.html

Bibliographic information