The Royal observatory, Greenwich: A glance at its history and work (Google eBook)

Front Cover
The Religious tract society, 1900 - Astronomy - 320 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 23 - our astronomical observer" at a salary of 100 per annum, his duty being "forthwith to apply himself with the most exact care and diligence to the rectifying the tables of the motions of the heavens and the places of the fixed stars, so as to find out the so much desired longitude of places for the perfecting the art of navigation.
Page 39 - forthwith to apply himself with the most exact care and diligence to the rectifying the tables of the motions of the heavens, and the places of the fixed stars, so as to find out the so much desired longitude of places for the perfecting the art of navigation.
Page 202 - If we ask to what end magnificent establishments are maintained by states and sovereigns, furnished with master-pieces of art, and placed under the direction of men of first-rate talent and high-minded enthusiasm, sought out for those qualities among the foremost in the ranks of science : if we demand cui bono?
Page 33 - To have the year and day of the observations; " 2. The height of two stars, and on which side of the meridian they appeared ; " 3. The height of the moon's two limbs ; ' 4. The height of the pole : all to degrees and minutes ; it was easy to perceive from these demands that the Sieur understood not that the best lunar tables differed from the heavens ; and that therefore his demands were not sufficient for determining the longitude of the place where such observations were, or should be made,...
Page 16 - Fair is our lot O goodly is our heritage ! (Humble ye, my people, and be fearful in your mirth ! ) For the Lord our God Most High He hath made the deep as dry, He hath smote for us a pathway to the ends of all the Earth ! Yea, though we sinned and our rulers went from righteousness Deep in all dishonour though we stained our garments
Page 203 - The stars are the landmarks of the universe; and, amidst the endless and complicated fluctuations of our system, seem placed by its Creator as guides and records, not merely to elevate our minds by the contemplation of what is vast, but to teach us to direct our actions by reference to what is immutable in His works.
Page 45 - Enow of such as for their bellies' sake, Creep and intrude, and climb into the fold? Of other care they little reckoning make, Than how to scramble at the shearers' feast, And shove away the worthy bidden guest; Blind mouths! that scarce themselves know how to hold A sheep-hook, or have learned aught else the least That to the faithful herdman's art belongs!
Page 33 - ... hope to find the longitude of places by lunar observations, but not by such as he demanded. But, that we were so far from having the places of the fixed stars...
Page 32 - Easter, an accident happened that hastened, if it did not occasion, the building of the observatory. A Frenchman, that called himself Le Sieur de St. Pierre, having some small skill in astronomy, and made an interest with a French lady* then in favour at court, proposed no less than the discovery of the longitude : and had procured a kind of commission from the king to the Lord Brouncker, Dr. Ward (Bishop of Salisbury), Sir Christopher Wren, Sir Charles Scarborough, Sir Jonas Moore, Colonel Titus,...
Page 203 - Every well-determined star, from the moment its place is registered, becomes to the astronomer, the geographer, the navigator, the surveyor, a point of departure which can never deceive or fail him, the same for ever and in all places, of a delicacy so extreme as to be a test for every instrument yet invented by man, yet equally adapted for the most ordinary purposes ; as available for regulating a town clock, as for conducting a navy to the Indies; as effective for mapping down the intricacies...

Bibliographic information