The Deputy

Front Cover
Grove Press, 1964 - History - 352 pages
4 Reviews
In A Certain Curve of Horn, veteran journalist John Frederick Walker tells the story of one of the most revered and endangered of the regal beasts of Africa: the giant sable antelope of Angola, a majestic, coal-black quadruped with breathtaking curved horns more than five feet long. It is an enthralling and tragic tale of exploration and adventure, politics and war, the brutal realities of life in Africa today, and the bitter choices of conflicting conservation strategies. A Certain Curve of Horn traces the sable's emergence as a highly sought-after natural history prize before the First World War, and follows its struggle to survive in a war zone fought over by the troops of half a dozen nations and its transformation into a political symbol and conservation icon. As he follows the trail of this mysterious animal, Walker interweaves the stories of the adventurers, scientists, and warriors who have come under the thrall of the beast, and how their actions would shape the fate of the giant sable antelope and the history of the war-torn nation that is its only home. A new epilogue by the author and pages of illustrations are included.
  

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Review: The Deputy

User Review  - Rhonda - Goodreads

I picked this off a shelf of a used bookstore, recalling the stir that it had made many years ago, hoping to use some of the material for a radio show. When I read it over 20 years ago, I was not able ... Read full review

Review: The Deputy

User Review  - Mommalibrarian - Goodreads

I am not a historian so I cannot tell how much of this fiction is true. I read the Samuel French, Inc. edition which is meant to be used in staging a performance. It did not contain all the extra ... Read full review

Contents

II
7
III
35
IV
62
V
113
VI
141
VII
199
VIII
201
IX
253
XI
295
XII
346
XIII
384
XIV
409
XV
415
XVI
457
XVII
463
XVIII
465

X
269

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Page xi - We carry with us the wonders we seek without us: there is all Africa and her prodigies in us; we are that bold and adventurous piece of Nature, which he that studies wisely learns in a compendium what others labour at in a divided piece and endless volume.

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