Disease and Security: Natural Plagues and Biological Weapons in East Asia

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Routledge, 2007 - History - 229 pages
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Focusing on East Asia, this book sets out a framework for analyzing infectious disease threats in security terms. It covers the security significance of naturally occurring disease outbreak events such as SARS and avian influenza, the development and use of biological weapons by state and non-state actors, and the security risks associated with laboratory research on pathogenic micro-organisms.

Christian Enemark devises a conceptual framework for securitization that is useful for policy makers by using the overlaps and synergies between different infectious disease threats. The book draws heavily on material from public health and scientific literature to illustrate the cross-disciplinary requirements for addressing infectious diseases challenges in security terms. Fast-moving, naturally occurring disease threats are of increasing concern to governments and individuals, and it is therefore important to recognize their close relationship to the security challenges posed by Biological Weapons and pathogen research.

Disease and Security will be of much interest to students of international security, public health and Asian politics.

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About the author (2007)

Christian Enemark is a lecturer in Global Security at the University of New South Wales and Deputy Director of the National Centre for Biosecurity at the Australian National University

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