The Invisible Universe: The Story of Radio Astronomy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Mar 20, 2007 - Science - 169 pages
1 Review
Hidden from human view, accessible only to sensitive receivers attached to huge radio telescopes, giant versions of backyard satellite dishes, the invisible universe beyond our senses continues to fascinate and intrigue our imaginations. We cannot really comprehend what it means to say that a galaxy is exploding, yet that is the nature of some of the distant radio sources in the furthest reaches of space. Closer to home, in the Milky Way galaxy, radio astronomers listen patiently to the ticking of pulsars that tell of star death and states of matter of awesome densities. And between the stars, radio emission from a host of over 120 complex molecules radiate outward to reveal a tale about chemical processes that produce the very stuff of life. And all of this happens out there in the universe hidden from our eyes, even when aided by the Hubble Space Telescope. This is the story of radio astronomy, of how radio waves are generated by stars, supernova, quasars, colliding galaxies, and by the very beginnings of the universe itself. In The Invisible Universe, you learn what astronomers are doing with those huge dishes in the New Mexico desert, in a remote valley in Puerto Rico, in the green Pocahontas Valley in West Virginia, as well as dozens of other remote sites around the world. With each of these observatories, the scientists collect and analyze their data, 'listening' to the radio signals from space, in order to learn what is out there, and perhaps even if someone else may be listening as well.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Invisible Universe: The Story of Radio Astronomy

User Review  - Dane - Goodreads

It was a slow progress through this one, but so good! This book talks mostly about the short history of radio astronomy. But since its history is so short, around 55 years perhaps, the author has ... Read full review

Contents

What is Radio Astronomy?
4
12 The Birth of Radio Astronomy
5
13 So What Is Radio Astronomy?
8
133 What is a Radio Source?
10
14 Radio Interferometers
11
A Science is Born
14
22 Postwar YearsRadar Everywhere
16
23 The Southern Skies
18
92 A Black Hole and its Accretion Disk
81
93 Precession of the Accretion Disk
82
94 Radio Stars
83
95 Novae
85
96 Other Superstars
86
Radio Galaxies
87
103 The Largest Things in the Universe
88
105 The Radio Emitting Jets
89

24 Who Could Have Guessed?
19
25 Identity Crisis
20
26 An Epoch of Discovery
21
The Radio Sun and Planets
23
33 Solar Radio Emission
25
36 Radio Signals from the Planets
26
38 Jupiters Radiation Belts
27
39 The Planets as Radio Sources
29
The Galactic Radio Nebulae
33
42 Recent Guest Stars
34
43 Cassiopeia A
35
45 Supernovae and Life
37
46 Emission NebulaeStar Birth
38
47 HII Regions
39
Radio Waves from the Milky Way
40
53 Grote Reber Maps the Milky Way
42
55 The Appearance of the Radio Sky
43
56 Polarization of the Galactic Radio Waves
44
58 A Note on Distances
45
510 The Center of the Milky Way
46
511 Closeup Radio View of the Galactic Center
47
512 The Very Center and the Black Hole
49
Interstellar Hydrogen
51
63 Observations of Interstellar Neutral Hydrogen
52
65 Seeing into the Depths of Space
53
66 Anomalous Velocity Hydrogen
55
68 Neutral Hydrogen in Other Galaxies
56
Interstellar Molecules
59
72 What is a Molecule?
62
74 Masers in Space
63
75 MegaMasers
66
77 The Stages Immediately Following Star Birth
67
Pulsars
69
83 Where are the Pulsars?
71
84 Formation of Neutron Stars
72
85 Binary PulsarsNatures Fabulous Space Labs
74
86 Millisecond Pulsars
76
87 What Pulse Timing Tells Us?
77
88 Pulsars in Globular Clusters
78
The Galactic Superstars
79
Quasars
96
112 Brightness Variations
97
113 Parent Galaxies
98
The Modern View
99
The Grand Unification Active Galactic Nuclei
102
122 Seyfert Galaxies
104
124 Faster than LightSuperluminal Motions
105
125 Active Galactic Nuclei
106
126 Black Holes
107
127 Precession
109
128 Galactic Cannibalism
110
Beyond the QuasarsRadio Cosmology
112
132 Radio Astronomy and Cosmology
113
133 The Microwave Background
114
134 Beyond the Big BangMultiple Universes
115
135 How Smooth is Space?
116
136 Missing Mass Dark Matter?
118
137 Gravitational Lenses
119
On The Radio Astronomical Quest For Extraterrestrial Intelligence
122
142 The Harsh Realities of the SETI EquationA Modern Heresy
123
Radio Telescopes The Future
130
151 Bigger and Better
131
152 LowNoise Receivers
133
1541 ALMAThe Atacama Large MillimeterSubmillimeter Array
134
1542 LOFARLow Frequency Array
136
1543 SKAThe Square Kilometer Array
137
1544 PAPERPortable Array to Probe the Epoch of Ionization
138
Whats It All About?
140
162 Are We Still Open to the Unexpected?
141
164 So Whats It All About?
142
Appendix
145
A21 Wavelength and Frequency
146
A24 Spectral Lines
147
A3 The Brightness of Radio Sources
148
A5 Notation
149
A7 Astronomical Coordinate Systems
150
A8 Astronomical DistancesLooking Back in Time
151
Index
152
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 8 - ... depends on the energy of the particle and the strength of the magnetic field.
Page 7 - As is quite obvious, the actual discovery, that is, the first recording made of galactic radio noise, was purely accidental and no doubt would have been made sooner or later by others. If there is any credit due me, it is probably for a stubborn curiosity that demanded an explanation for the unknown interference and led me to the long series of recordings necessary for the determination of the actual direction of arrival.* *Quoted by WT Sullivan III in Serendipitous Discoveries in Radio Astronomy,...
Page 6 - Have I told you that I now have what I think is definite proof that the waves come from the Milky Way? However, I'm not working on the interstellar waves anymore.

References to this book

About the author (2007)

About the Author:
Gerrit L. Verschuur is a noted radio astronomer and author of many articles and books popularizing astronomy. He lives in Memphis, Tennessee.

Bibliographic information