Religion, Theology and the Human Sciences

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Cambridge University Press, 2002 - Political Science - 334 pages
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Religion, Theology and the Human Sciences explores the religious consequences of the so-called 'end of history' and 'triumph of capitalism' as they have impinged upon key institutions of social reproduction in recent times. The book explores the imposition of managerial modernity upon successive sectors of society and shows why many people today feel themselves to be oppressed by systems of management that seem to leave them no option but to conform. Richard Roberts seeks to challenge and outflank such seamless, oppressive modernity, through reconfiguration of the religious and spiritual field.
  

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Contents

The closed circle Marxism Christianity and the End of History
15
Religion and the enterprise culture the British experience from Thatcher to Blair 19792000
36
Power and empowerment New Age managers and the dialectics of modernitypostmodernity
62
The end of the university and the last academic?
86
THEOLOGY AND POWER IN THE MATRIX OF MODERNITYPOSTMODERNITY
111
Lord bondsman and churchman integrity identity and power in Anglicanism
113
Ruling the Body the care of souls in a managerial church
161
Theology and the social sciences
190
The souls of Europe identity religion and theology
217
Globalised religion? The Parliament of the Worlds Religions Chicago 1993 in theoretical perspective
248
Time virtuality and the Goddess transmutations of the religious field
269
CONCLUSION
293
Identity as vocation the prospect for rel1gion
295
Bibliography
306
Index
326
Copyright

RELIGION AND SOCIAL SCIENCE IDENTITY GLOBALISATION AND THE TRANSMUTATION OF THE RELIGIOUS FIELD
215

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About the author (2002)

Richard Roberts is Professor of Religious Studies at Lancaster University. He has not shrunk from controversy and is known among senior British academic figures for his pursuit of a consistently critical line against the managerialisation and bureaucratisation of both universities and churches. His publications include Hope and its Hieroglyph: A Critical Decipherment of Ernst Bloch's 'Principle of Hope' (1990), A Theology on its Way: Essays on Karl Barth (1992), The Recovery of Rhetoric: Persuasive Discourse and Disciplinarity in the Human Sciences (co-edited with J. M. M. Good, 1993), Religion and the Transformations of Capitalism: Comparative Approaches (editor, 1995), Nature Religion Today: Paganism in the Modern World (co-edited with Jo Pearson and Geoffrey Samuel, 1998), and Time and Value (co-edited with Scott Lash and Andrew Quick, 1998).

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