The spirit of laws, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Printed for P. Dodesley, 1794 - Jurisprudence
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Contents

The same subject continued
67
Of rewards conserred by the sovereign
71
Of the ancient French laws
89
Os the Roman laws in respect to punishments ibid
97
Of the luxury of China
108
Of the guardianship of women among the Romans
114
Of the corruption of the principle of despotic govern
127
IT Distinctive properties of a monarchy
133
Particular case of the Spanish monarchy 234
134
Consequence of the preceding chapters
135
Chap
138
That a consederate government ought to be composed of states of the fame nature especially of the repub lican kind
140
In what manner despotic goverments provide for their security
141
In what part a monarchical government provides for its security
142
Of the desensive force of the states in general ibid 7 A reslection
144
Of the relative force of states
145
Of Laws in the Relation they bear to Offensive Force Chap Page 1 Of offensive force
146
Of war ibid 3 Of the right of conquest
147
Some advantages of a conquered people
149
Gelon king of Syracuse
151
The fame subject continued
152
The same subject continued
153
Of one monarchy that subdues another
154
Of the manners of a conquered people
155
Of a law of Cyrus ibid 13 Alexander
156
Charles XII
158
New methods of preserving a conquest
159
Of conquests made by a despotic prince 6o
160
Of the Laws that form Political Liberty with regard to the Constitution Chap Page 1 A general idea
161
Different signisications given to the word liberty
162
In what liberty consists
163
Of the end or view of different governments
164
Of the monarchies we are acquainted with
176
Aristotles manner of thinking
178
Of the kings of the heroic times of Greece
179
Of the government of the kings of Rome and in what manner the three powers were there distributed
180
General reflections on the state of Rome aster the ex pulsion of its kings
182
In what manner the distribution of the three powers began to change aster the expulsion of the kings
183
In what manner Rome while in the slourishing state of the republic suddenly lost its liberty
185
Of the legislative powers in the Roman republic
187
Of the executive power in the fame republic
188
Of the crime of hightreason
207
The same subject continued
209
The same subject continued
210
Of the revealing os conspiracies ibid
216
Of anonymous letters
222
Of siscal punishments
234
Of the augmentation of troops ibid
240
Contradiction in the characters of some southern
247
Chap
248
JO Of the laws relative to the sobriety of the people ibid
253
In what Manner the Laws of Civil Slavery are rela
259
Chap Pag 4 Another origin of the right of slavery
262
Of the slavery of the Negroes
263
The true origin of the right of slavery
264
J Another origin of the right of slavery
265
Several kinds of slavery
266
Regulations necessary in respect to slavery
267
Abuses of slavery ibid 12 Danger from the multitude of slaves
268
Of armed slaves
269
The fame subject continued
270
Precautions to be used in moderate governments
271
Regulations between masters and slaves
273
Of infranchisements
274
Of freedmen and eunuchs
276
How the Laws of Domestic Slavery have a Relation to the Nature of the Climate Chap Pag 1 Of domestic servitude
277
That in the countries of the south there is a natural inequality between the two sexes
278
That a plurality of wives depends greatly on the means of supporting them
279
That the law of polygamy is an affair that depends on calculation
280
The reason of a law of Malabar
281
Of an equality of treatment in case of many wives
282
S Of the separation of women from men
283
The principle on which the morals of the East are founded
284
Of domestic slavery independently of polygamy
286
Of jealousy
287
Of the eastern manner of domestic government
288
Of repudiation and divorce amongst the Romans 290
290
CTup Page
292
Of Laws in the Relation they bear to the Nature
300
Of savage nations and nations os barbarians
306
The fame subject continued ibid BOOK XI
324
Chap
325

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 163 - We must have continually present to our minds the difference between independence and liberty. Liberty is a right of doing whatever the laws permit, and if a citizen could do what they forbid he would be no longer possessed of liberty, because all his fellow-citizens would have the same power.
Page 171 - ... have the means of examining in what manner its laws have been executed; an advantage which this government has over that of Crete and Sparta, where the cosmi and the ephori gave no account of their administration.
Page 138 - It is very probable," says he,* " that mankind would have been obliged, at length, to live constantly under the Government of a single person, had they not contrived a kind of Constitution, that has all the internal advantages of a Republican, together with the external force of a Monarchical Government.
Page 91 - That if we inquire into the cause of all human corruptions, we shall find that they proceed from the impunity of crimes, and not from the moderation of punishments.
Page 175 - Neither do I pretend by this to undervalue other governments, nor to say that this extreme political liberty ought to give uneasiness to those who have only a moderate share of it. How should I have any such design, I who think that even the...
Page 10 - As most citizens have sufficient ability to choose, though unqualified to be chosen, so the people, though capable of calling others to an account for their administration, are incapable of conducting the administration themselves. The public business must be carried on with a certain motion, neither too quick nor too slow. But the motion of the people is always either too remiss or too violent. Sometimes with a hundred thousand arms they overturn all before them; and sometimes with a hundred thousand...
Page 168 - Holland, they ought to be accountable to their constituents; but it is a different thing in England, where they are deputed by boroughs. All the inhabitants of the...
Page 329 - We have said that the laws were the particular and precise institutions of a legislator, and manners and customs the institutions of a nation in general. Hence it follows that when these manners and customs are to be changed, it ought not to be done by laws; this would have too much the air of tyranny: it would be better to change them by introducing other manners and other customs.
Page 163 - In governments, that is, in societies directed by laws, liberty can consist only in the power of doing what we ought to will, and in not being constrained to do what we ought not to will.
Page 175 - It is natural for mankind to set a higher value upon courage than timidity, on activity than prudence, on strength than counsel. Hence the army will ever despise a senate, and respect their own officers. They will naturally slight the orders sent them by a body of men whom they look upon as cowards, and therefore unworthy to command them.

Bibliographic information