Voices of the American Past: Documents in U.S. History, Volume 1

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Cengage Learning, May 3, 2007 - History - 304 pages
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VOICES OF THE AMERICAN PAST is a two-volume reader that presents a variety of diverse perspectives through more than 230 primary sources. Excerpts from speeches, letters, journals, magazine articles, hearings and government documents raise issues from both public and private aspects of American life throughout history. A Guide to Reading and Interpreting Documents in the front matter explains how and why historians use primary source evidence, and outlines basic points to help students learn to analyze sources. Brief headnotes set each source into context. Questions to Consider precede each document, offering prompts for critical thinking and reflection. The volumes are organized chronologically into 31 chapters, with the Reconstruction chapter overlapping in both volumes -- corresponding to the splits of most survey texts.
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Contents

Diverse Beginnings
1
Emerging Colonial Societies
21
Toward an American Identity
38
Coming of the Revolution
56
Creating the New Nation
76
The Limits of Republicanism
103
The New Nation and Its Place in the World
125
The Rise of Democracy
143
Society and Economy in the North
160
Social Reform
180
Manifest Destiny
198
Slavery and the Old South
216
Origins of the Civil War
234
The Civil War
252
Reconstruction
271
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Raymond M. Hyser is a Professor of History at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. His research interests include the study of race and ethnicity in the Gilded Age. He teaches courses in U.S. History, U.S. Business History, Gilded Age America, and Historical Methods.

J. Chris Arndt is a Professor of History at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA. His research interests include the study of state's rights and economic change in antebellum America. He teaches courses in U.S. History, American Revolution, Early Republic and Historical Methods.

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