The New Urban Infrastructure: Cities and Telecommunications (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Jurgen Schmandt
Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1990 - Social Science - 327 pages
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Traditionally, city governments have played an active role in the administration of public works that were necessary to the economic survival of the community. However, a major element of the new urban infrastructure, advanced telecommunications networks, are developing in such a way that the municipal role in its development is minimal. This book presents new information on the rapidly changing configuration of urban telecommunications. The editors examine important planning data illustrating how major metro areas are dealing with new opportunities in telecommumication. They describe the interplay among current stakeholders in this area: public utility commissions, city planners and service providers, state governments, telecommunications users (especially large businesses), and consumer groups. The book provides case studies of major U.S. cities, one Canadian city, a metropolitan area on the U.S.-Mexican border, as well as smaller cities that have positioned themselves for international economic trade whereby telecommunications will play a major role.

The contributors find that cities need to be more involved in understanding how telecommunications systems are changing and in planning how they can best exploit new opportunities afforded by these systems. They contend that while telecommunication may not cause economic development, it seems to be a necessary condition for it. The book offers clear illustrations of the extent to which business users depend on communications. The ability of business and government to bypass the local carrier has important implications for the public network and for cities in their use of telecommunication.

  

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Contents

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Copyright

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Page 315 - Stationary satellite. A satellite, the circular orbit of which lies in the plane of the earth's equator and which turns about the polar axis of the Earth in the same direction and with the same period as those of the earth's rotation.
Page 315 - The communications systems required to get from the earth station to where the information or program is to be received and used. Terrestrial broadcasting from local stations and/or cable television systems provide the final mile for today's satellite networks.
Page 315 - ... frequency the number of recurrences of a phenomenon during a specified period of time. Electrical frequency is expressed in hertz, equivalent to cycles per second. frequency spectrum a term describing a range of frequencies of electromagnetic waves in radio terms; the range of frequencies useful for radio communications, from about 10 kilohertz to 3000 gigahertz.

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